What's Inside the 2020-21 AHA Program of Studies

AHA's Program of Studies is a comprehensive course catalog with a description of the school's requirements for graduation and for student honors.



Our Mission and Values

The mission of the Academy of Holy Angels is to educate and nurture a diverse student population so that each student as a whole person, may achieve full potential to excel intellectually, to live spiritually, to lead responsibly, to act justly, and to serve selflessly.

As a Catholic college-preparatory high school, AHA focuses on the principles in its mission statement:

To excel intellectually

For AHA students, learning is an opportunity for challenge, growth and exploration through classes in core curriculum, languages, world cultures, technology, theater, visual arts, instrumental and vocal music, life-long fitness, practical arts, theology, and Christian ministry and service.

AHA offers many opportunities for advanced learning. Our goal is to give every student the chance to take a college-level class at AHA. Advanced classes teach students how to study and prepare for rigorous learning, and the experience helps them perform better in high school and later. AHA offers 17 AP courses.

AHA’s Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program ensures that every AHA student learns how to write in a number of disciplines. Completing a writing portfolio is a graduation requirement, and we’ve learned that WAC yields results.

At AHA, we incorporate technology throughout the curriculum. In fact, we have articulated a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) course of study to guide students interested in pre-engineering. See full details and recommendations for this program in the Science section of this Program of Studies.

Our students learn computer skills, multimedia techniques, spreadsheets, ethics in technology, and technology search and research. AHA’s technology program puts a computer in the hands of every student. The 1:1 technology program is fully implemented and is an integral component of learning at AHA. 

To live spiritually

At the core of life at Holy Angels is a worshipping, faith-filled community dedicated to living the message of Jesus Christ. These values are the focus of the school’s year-long worship program of Masses and liturgies, of the daily coursework in Theology classes, and in the activities of the Campus Ministry Team, and they also extend to our cocurriculars as part of our Faith in Action program.

AHA Our MissionTo lead responsibly

AHA recognizes the need to teach leadership skills. Providing leadership opportunities is a focus in the classroom, on the playing field, in the theater, and through cocurricular opportunities in the arts, student government, service, and more. 

To act justly

Justice is a principle woven throughout the AHA curriculum and rooted in our heritage from the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Our teachers look for opportunities to bring conversations about justice into classroom discussions. Helping students gain an “understanding of, and commitment to, love of God and neighbor in justice” is one of the AHA Theology Department’s guiding principles. Classes like Catholic Social Action and others focus on justice in our communities and our world.

To serve selflessly

AHA students participate in service at many levels. Students are required to perform 75 hours of service to graduate. AHA provides a range of volunteer service opportunities.

Our Values

Members of the Academy’s community value:

Leadership, Academic Rigor and Individual Excellence: We expect continuous growth and leadership in students and staff. We engage students in rich and rigorous college-preparatory learning opportunities and cocurricular opportunities. We actively engage staff in meaningful leadership and professional development opportunities to meet the school’s strategic goals.

Faith and Spirituality: We are a Catholic faith community dedicated to the message and example of Jesus Christ.

Welcoming Community: We welcome people of all faiths and backgrounds by creating a spirit of community among students, parents, staff, alumni and friends of AHA.

Service: In the spirit of our founders, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, we model Christ’s message of service and encourage and provide numerous opportunities to serve others.

Respect: We expect that staff, students and parents treat each other with respect and embrace and celebrate the uniqueness of cultures and of individuals.

Personal Attention: We strive to know our students individually. We care for the well‐being of each of them.

Partnership with Parents: We see parents as a support system in the students’ educational experiences.

Safe Environment: We provide a physically and emotionally safe environment for all members of the Holy Angels community. 

AHA Administration

Thomas E. Shipley President, 612-798-2602
Heidi J. Foley, Principal, 612-798-2682
Mark H. Melhorn, Assistant Principal, 612-798-2641
Meg Angevine, Admissions Officer, 612-798-0764
Jesse A. Foley, Alumni Officer, 612-798-2621
Michael Kautzman, Director of Athletics, 612-798-2634
David Devine, Chief Financial Officer, 612-798-2655
Brian M. McCartan, Annual Fund Officer, 612-798-2618
Sarah Taffe, Counseling Department Chair, 612-798-2654

AdvancEDBlue Ribbon AwardMN Quality Award

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Registration and Honor Roll

Registering at AHA

Careful planning is the key to creating a program that’s right for you! Consult your teachers, counselors and parents about your course selections. Go to Program of Studies online at academyofholyangels.org for full course descriptions and additional planning tools.

Students and their parents/guardians may find it helpful to begin to draft an overall plan for their high school coursework before registering for the coming school year. Please refer to the Course Planning Guide online to draft a four-year plan. All students should enroll in a minimum of six courses per trimester for a seven-period day. Any exceptions must receive prior approval from the Guidance Department.

Course offerings are not finalized until everyone has registered, and the master schedule has been finished in August. Until that time, “registration” is actually a course request process. Requesting courses does not guarantee the course requested will necessarily be scheduled. Returning students register first, and incoming 9th graders register at the end of February.

It’s best to avoid making changes after you’ve registered. In order to make a course change, parents must give written permission for the change, and pay a $35.00 fee at the time of the change. After the registration process in February, or when classes begin in the fall, a fee of $35.00 is assessed for any schedule change including dropped classes. Course changes without a fee are made for students if an incorrect class is scheduled, if a teacher recommends that the student take a different course, or if a course is inadvertently left off a student schedule. AHA cannot honor class schedule changes requested by students for the purpose of selecting (or avoiding) specific teachers or for requesting specific class times. Students may not add a class after the fifth day of the trimester. Students may not drop a seventh class after the fifteenth day of the trimester.

In order to stay in advanced coursework, students must maintain at least a “C” average or have the teacher’s permission to continue in the class. If students fail an advanced course, they must move to a regular level.

Shortage of credits

Students are required to make satisfactory progress toward graduation in order to continue enrollment at Academy of Holy Angels.

If students fail a course and are subsequently short the required number of credits toward graduation, it is their responsibility to make arrangements to make up the failed course and the loss of credit through summer school at AHA (see “Failed Courses” below) or possibly by enrolling in additional courses at the Academy of Holy Angels. Failed courses must be made up within one calendar year after the original failed grade is posted.

For seniors--graduation and diplomas

Diplomas are granted only to those students who have successfully completed the AHA graduation requirements. If a senior is one to four credits short of the requirements at the time of graduation, the student will be allowed to participate in the commencement exercises but will not receive a signed diploma. If a senior is short five or more credits, he or she will not be allowed to participate in the commencement exercises and will not receive a signed diploma until all requirements have been met.

Incompletes

A student may be assigned an incomplete grade at the end of a trimester. Normally this happens when the student has been unavoidably absent due to illness, or unable to complete school work due to some unusual circumstances. Carrying incompletes for a long period of time rarely helps the student. It creates added work and detracts from time spent on the current trimester courses.

School policy requires that students make up incompletes within two weeks of the beginning of the next trimester. If the student does not make up the incomplete, the grade becomes a fail (F) and no credit is given. Any extension to this rule must be approved by the principal or counselor and the instructor.

Report cards

Mid-trimester grades will be available online within one week after grades have been reported by the teachers. Trimester grades will be available online approximately one week after the end of each trimester. Trimester grades and transcripts for students who owe money for tuition and fines, along with athletic, academic testing, and transportation fees will not be available until the account has been satisfied. Parents and guardians who do not have online access should notify the school.

Failed courses

When a student fails a course required for graduation, the course must be made up in one of the following ways:

  1. Failures in the required areas of English, Theology, Science, and World History must be made up in summer school at Holy Angels. This requires registration for summer school via the Counseling Department.
  2. Other failures (those not in English, Theology, Science, or World History) may be made up in summer school at AHA if offered or by registering to re-take the course during another trimester.

It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that the Counseling Department is aware of the plan. The grade earned by a student exercising option 2 will be included in calculating that student’s grade point average. All failed courses must be made up within one calendar year after the original failed grade is posted.

Honor Roll

Transfer credits

Students who transfer to AHA during or after their freshman year are considered to be transfer students. Courses, grades, and credits from the student’s previous school are evaluated to determine the graduation requirements the student has completed.

When AHA sends student transcripts to other schools, it will include Holy Angels transcript of grades and transcripts of grades earned at other schools. A student keeps all grades earned from freshman through senior year – no matter where the grades were earned, and whether or not they were weighted at the previous school.

Procedures for advanced classes

The minimum requirements (prerequisites) needed to register for an advanced course are stated in each course description in this Program of Studies. In addition to a minimum acceptable grade in a prerequisite course, a departmental application form often must be completed. It is the obligation of students registering for advanced classes to fulfill all the requirements prior to registration.

Electives

Elective courses may be taken only once, except for band, choir, and competition sports, which can be taken multiple times. 

 

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Requirements for Graduation

A total of 72 credits is required for graduation. (1 credit =1 trimester of successfully completed work.) In unusual cases, the counselor may make an exception to this requirement. Ordinarily, credit can be awarded only once for each course.

A student must have:

English

12 credits

Math

9 credits

Science

9 credits (including 3 credits of Biology, 3 credits of Chemistry, and 3 credits of Physics)

Social Studies

9 credits

Theology

12 credits

Fine Arts

3 credits

Physical Education                                  

3 credits

*Online Health

1 credit

 

58 Required Credits

+14 Elective Credits


72 Total Credits

Additional Requirements:

*Online Health is an ongoing one-credit course. Students attend class sessions at intervals throughout the school year. They must also complete online assignments each year. When the students complete the class during the senior year, they receive one academic credit.


GRADE 9 REQUIREMENTS:

A minimum of 18 credits required, 6 each trimester:

Required courses: (16 credits )

English

(3 credits)

Mathematics

(3 credits)

Science

(3 credits)

Physical Education   

(1 credit)

Social Studies

(3 credits)

Theology

(3 credits)

*Online Health

(results in one credit in the senior year)

GRADE 10 REQUIREMENTS:

A minimum of 18 credits required, 6 each trimester:

Required courses: (15 credits)

English

(3 credits)

Mathematics

(3 credits)

Science

(3 credits)

Physical Education   

(2 credit)

Theology

(3 credits)

*Online Health

(results in one credit in the senior year)

GRADE 11 REQUIREMENTS:

A minimum of 18 credits required, 6 each trimester:

Required courses: (15 credits)

English

(3 credits)

Mathematics

(3 credits)

Science

(3 credits)

Social Studies

(3 credit)

Theology

(3 credits)

*Online Health

(results in one credit in the senior year)

GRADE 12 REQUIREMENTS:

A minimum of 18 credits required, 6 each trimester:

Required courses (9 credits)

English

(3 credits)

Social Studies

(3 credit)

Theology

(3 credits)

*Online Health

(1 credit)

Highly recommended courses

Mathematics

(3 credits)

Science

(3 credit)

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College Admission Information

Colleges have a wide range of admission requirements. It is advisable to check with the college of the student’s choice for specific requirements. However, the general guidelines for a college preparatory program consist of four years of English, four years of mathematics, four years of science (including three years in lab science: biology, chemistry, and physics), three years of social studies, and two-to-four years of the same world language.

Students interested in attending highly selective colleges should take the most advanced courses available. It is essential to check with the individual college about admission requirements. This information is available in Naviance and online.

Testing required by colleges includes SAT or ACT tests which usually are taken at the end of the junior year and/or the beginning of the senior year. Selective colleges also may require some of the SAT Subject Tests. Tests may be selected from the following: Literature, US History, World History, Mathematics, French, German, Spanish, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. These tests should be taken in the spring of the junior year or fall of the senior year.

The college counselors assist students in finding appropriate college options. We advise students to apply to a variety of colleges to ensure they have adequate options when they make their final choices. Students should be realistic in assessing their own abilities, interests, and motivation and choose courses and colleges accordingly. 

Earning College Credit in High School

Through Advanced Placement (AP), students can study at the college level in high school and earn college advanced placement and/or credit. AHA offers the following AP classes:

Science: Biology*, Chemistry*, Physics I, Physics II
English: Language & Composition*, Literature & Composition*
Social Studies: US History*, US Government & Politics*, Psychology
Math: Calculus AB and BC*, Statistics*
World Language: Spanish Language
Fine Arts: AP Studio Art (3D), AP Studio Art (2D),
AP Studio Art (Draw)
Technology: AP Computer Science

AP credit is available through testing in German IV*, French IV* and Comparative Government

*In addition, college credit is available through St. Mary’s University of Minnesota PACC Program for starred AP courses and for Spanish IV. 

College and Career Planning Seminar

AHA requires a planning seminar (for one school day) to help juniors make informed decisions regarding their future educational and career plans. Each student will complete a portfolio of work which will include a completed college application, an extra curricular resume, a college search assignment, a college essay, and a job shadow or interview. This portfolio will be noted on the student transcripts as complete or incomplete. 

Special Recommendations

Business Major:

– 4 years of mathematics

Engineering Major:

– 4 years of mathematics
– 4 years of science (including 1 year each of biology, chemistry, and physics)
– Consider AP computer science, architectural model building, and computer aided design (CAD)

Health Careers:

– 4 years of mathematics
– 4 years of science (including 1 year each of biology, chemistry and physics)
– Consider anatomy and physiology

Most Majors

– 4 years of mathematics, science, English, and three years of social studies
– 2+ years of world language

Criteria colleges consider in making admission decisions:

  • Rigor of student coursework
  • High school grade point average (GPA)
  • Scores on college admission tests (ACT, SAT and SAT Subject Tests)
  • Involvement in co-curricular activities 

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Course Planning Guide

Course Planning: Ninth Grade (18 credits)

Eighteen credits required with a minimum of six credits each trimester. A credit is one course taken for one trimester.

Required classes for grade 9:

Trimester One

Trimester Two

Trimester Three

English 9 or Advanced English 9

English 9 or Advanced English 9

English 9 or Advanced English 9

World History & Geography

World History & Geography

World History & Geography

Jesus and the Christian Community

Bible I

Bible II

Math by teacher recommendation

Math

Math

Science by teacher recommendation

Science

Science

Physical Education 9--a one-trimester class to be placed in any of the three trimesters.

Health is an online course, integrated into the existing curriculum, grades 9-12.

Elective classes for grade 9: Ninth graders will take five one-trimester electives or three trimesters of a world language and two one-trimester electives. If electives are full, students will be assigned to a study hall. Ninth grade students who take band or choir will take it in conjunction with their ninth grade Physical Education class.


Course Planning: Tenth Grade (18 credits)

Eighteen credits required with a minimum of six credits each trimester. A credit is one course taken for one trimester.

Required classes for grade 10:

Trimester One

Trimester Two

Trimester Three

English 10 or Advanced English 10

English 10 or Advanced English 10

English 10 or Advanced English 10

The Church & The Paschal Mystery

Sacraments

Morality

Math (next sequential course)

Math

Math

Science (next sequential course)

Science

Science

Physical Education*

Fine Arts Elective

Physical Education*

*These two Physical Education classes may be taken in any trimester.

Health is an online course, integrated into the existing curriculum, grades 9-12.

Electives for grade 10: Students must choose three, and may choose up to six, additional credits from Fine Arts, Practical Arts, Social Studies, Technology, and World Language. World Language is a three-credit course. All other electives are one credit, except music courses which can be taken for one, two or three credits. A study hall will automatically be added each trimester if only six classes are selected in that trimester. Elective requests cannot be guaranteed and are subject to availability.


Course Planning: Eleventh Grade (18 credits)

Eighteen credits required with a minimum of six credits each trimester. A credit is one course taken for one trimester.

Required classes for grade 11:

Trimester One

Trimester Two

Trimester Three

English 11 or  AP English Language and Composition

English 11 or AP English Language and Composition

English 11 or AP English Language and Composition

Church History

Catholic Social Action

Prayer and Spirituality

U. S. History or AP U. S. History

U. S. History or AP U. S. History

U. S. History or AP U. S. History

Math (next sequential course)

Math

Math

Science (next sequential course)

Science

Science

All juniors will complete a required one-day college and career planning course and portfolio. Students do not need to register for this class, as it will be integrated into the regular school curriculum.

Health is an online course, integrated into the existing curriculum, grades 9-12.

Electives for grade 11: Students must choose three, and may choose up to six, additional credits from Fine Arts, Physical Education and Health, Practical Arts, Technology and World Language. World Language is a three-credit course. All other electives are one credit, except Music courses which can be taken for one, two or three credits. A study hall will automatically be added each trimester if only six classes are selected in that trimester. Elective requests cannot be guaranteed and are subject to availability.


Course Planning: Twelfth Grade (18 credits)

Eighteen credits required with a minimum of six credits each trimester. A credit is one course taken for one trimester.

Required classes for grade 12:

Trimester One

Trimester Two

Trimester Three

English 12 or AP Literature and Composition

English 12 or AP Literature and Composition

English 12 or AP Literature and Composition

CMT or Moral Philosophy

CMT or Comparative Religions

CMT or Senior Theology Seminar

Economics

Option 1: US Government

Contemporary World Affairs or Sociology

 

Option 2: AP US Government 

AP US Government

Senior year options for Social Studies.

  1. Trimester 1 of Economics plus Trimester 2 of US Goverment and Trimester 3 of Contemporary World Affairs or Sociology
  2. Trimester 1 of Economics plus Trimester 2, 3 of AP US Government

Health is an online course, integrated into the existing curriculum, grades 9-12.

Electives for grade 12: Students must choose nine, and may choose up to twelve, additional credits from English, Fine Arts, Mathematics, Physical Education and Health, Fine Arts, Science, Technology and World Language. World Language is a three-credit course. Other electives are one credit, except music courses which can be taken for one, two or three credits. A study hall will be added each trimester if only six classes are selected in that trimester.

 

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Special Academic Programs

Library Media Department

Library Media Department Philosophy

Students and their classroom teachers are the focus of our program. Their need to know and their right to access information is the foundation of our department. We believe that recreational and critical reading should coexist with exposure to 21st century skills, and that both are important for success. Therefore, a variety of materials in many formats is provided to support the curriculum and accommodate a range of abilities, viewpoints, needs, and interests.

General Description

A media specialist works with students individually and in classroom groups to enhance research strategies, apply technology skills, and promote the ethical use of information. The media collection, its services, and resources are essential to the successful completion of class assignments and projects.

Information Literacy Curriculum (SKILL)

We have a specific information literacy curriculum designed to increase student abilities in the areas of locating, evaluating, processing, and communicating information.

Students are exposed to literacy sessions embedded in assignments from required classes. Each year additional skills are added in the areas of OPAC (print resource catalog), databases, web search, and ethics and technology. During their senior year, students are assessed to determine their level of proficiency. This curriculum is called SKILL: Students, Knowledge, Information Literacy, and Learning.

Information Literacy Outcomes:

Core lessons in the SKILL Curriculum

Freshman Year:

  • TRAILS Pre-Test
  • OPAC Strand: Introduction to LaRock Library/Guided Tour/Introduction to Library Catalog
  • OPAC Strand: Individual /Collective Biographies and Specialized Encyclopedias
  • Database Strand: Introduction to Databases
  • Web Strand: Google presentations • Ethics and Technology Strand: Cyberbullying, Avoiding Plagiarism and Using Paraphrasing

Sophomore Year:

  • OPAC Strand: Inter-library loans
  • OPAC Strand: Keyword vs. Subject Searches
  • Narrowing a Research Topic
  • Database Strand: Specialized Databases for Controversial Issues (Points of View)
  • Web Strand: MLA Citation Types
  • Boolean Logic
  • Web Strand: CABL method for evaluating websites and other sources
  • Ethics and Technology Strand: Assorted Online Privacy Issues

Junior Year:

  • OPAC Strand: Primary and Secondary Resources
  • Database Strand: Public Library Databases
  • Web Strand: Online Resources, LibGuides
  • Ethics and Technology Strand: US Copyright Law, Citing Images

Senior Year:

  • OPAC Strand: Refined searches
  • Database Strand: Journal articles
  • Discussion boards
  • Ethics and Technology Strand: Netiquette, Avoiding Identity Theft, Technology and Health
  • TRAILS Post Test


Online Health

Health - Online

1 credit

Grade Level: 9-12

This course takes a holistic approach to health as it includes physical, social, and emotional aspects of health. It is a required curriculum for all four years for students in grades 9-12. Because the curriculum is taught each year, it allows faculty to present to and discuss age-appropriate health topics with students. The course is taught combining online work with in-class, face-to-face interaction and instruction by a health teacher. Students will meet with teacher for classroom instruction and will communicate and work online with the instructor to complete assignments.

The Safe and Sacred Places Curriculum is used for the purpose of fulfilling the Protection of Children and Youth mandate of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. It is a safe and healthy relationship education program for the prevention of sexual abuse; it is not about sex education. If you have questions about this curriculum, please talk directly with the health teacher, a theology teacher, an administrator, or counselor.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

    1. Wellness;
    2. Mental health and emotional wellness;
    3. Violence awareness;
    4. Substance use, abuse and addiction;
    5. Human growth and development;
    6. Diversity awareness; and
    7. Personal safety. 

 



Service Requirement

In response to the Gospel call to serve others, the Church’s call to witness as disciples, the Sisters of St. Joseph’s call to serve the “dear neighbor” and AHA’s mission to serve selflessly, it is the desire of AHA to form students to be people of service in their daily lives.

The desired outcome is that students are people of service who can identify, and work to solve, social issues and real-world problems.

Christian Service Graduation Requirements

AHA requires 15 hours of volunteer Christian service per year for ninth graders, 20 hours per year for tenth, eleventh, and twelfth graders. Students submit hours each trimester to remain current. Students who do not meet trimester requirements will be marked incomplete and hence academically ineligible (for definition, see the Academics section of the Student Policy Handbook) until hours are complete. Incomplete service hours will need to be completed in the summer before moving on to the next grade level.

The term “service” is understood as participating in actions for persons, groups, or agencies without payment or other compensation and for whom the recipient is not a relative.

See "Service Requirements" on the AHA website in the Student Policies Handbook.

Blue and Gold Service Awards

Students can earn a Blue Service Award by doubling their required service hours (serving a total of 30 hours for ninth graders and 40 hours for tenth, eleventh, and twelfth graders) or a Gold Service Award by tripling their required service hours (serving a total of 45 hours for ninth graders and 60 hours for tenth, eleventh, and twelfth graders) in one academic year. Students are recognized in the spring.

Summer Hours

Summer hours of service are applied to the upcoming year, beginning on the first day following Celebration Day. When a student participates in intensive, short-term service experiences such as volunteering for a week in the summer at a camp, or participating in a mission trip, a maximum of 8 hours per day will be awarded to the student. Hours to be applied to the service requirement need to be completed on or after the first day of freshmen year.

Freshman Year Service Assignments

Service hours are due to the service coordinator incrementally throughout the year and some hours will assigned to the student through academic classes, such as theology. 


Grade 9 service requirements summarized

Trimester I: One service assignment in Jesus and the Christian Community class (with Campus Ministry team member)

= 4 hours

Trimester II: : One service assignment in The Bible class; Ninth Grade Service and Fun Day 

= 5 hours

Trimester III: Three “on your own” service hours; three hours from All School Service Day

= 6 hours

School year total                                   = 15 hours


Grade 10 service requirements summarized

Sophomore Impact project introduced in Tri 1 theology class and completed throughout the year

Trimester I: One two-hour service assignment in theology class; five hours “on your own” 

= 7 hours

[submit all summer hours]

Trimester II: One two-hour service assignment in theology class; hours at Sophomore Service Retreat; hours “on your own”

= 7 hours

Trimester III: three “on your own” service hours; plus three hours from All School Service Day

= 6 hours

School year total                                  = 20 hours


Grade 11 and 12 service requirements summarized

Juniors and seniors can meet the service requirement in a variety of ways:

  1. Submit hours that they have serve “on their own”, similar to the process in grades 9 and 10. (Students must complete seven hours Trimester 1; seven hours in Trimester II, and three hours "on your own", plus three hours on All School Service Day in Trimester III for year-end total of 20 hours.)
  2. Before the summer between their junior and senior years, students will complete an AHA service-learning trip or parish mission trip and submit hours at the beginning of the school year.
  3. Students submit hours in a combination of ways: curricular and co-curricular service learning opportunities such as service-learning classes (teachers will designate the number of service hours they will receive), Faith in Action, Respect Life Club, Social Justice Club, Students Assisting Students, National Honor Society, Student Government, Parish Youth Groups and/or Eagle Scout Awards.


STEM Diploma

The faculty of AHA believes that four years of core-course study in science, mathematics and technology, that incorporates the principles of engineering, is the best preparation to enter prestigious college and university programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Students in all AHA mathematics and science courses achieve the essential elements of a STEM program.

The STEM Diploma recognizes those students who have dedicated themselves to mastery of this rigorous course of study and who can demonstrate and apply 21st Century Skills in Critical Thinking, Creativity, Communication, and Collaboration in the curricular and co-curricular areas. 


Learner Outcomes

Science: By completing four years of core science courses, inclusive of biology, chemistry, and physics, students will be prepared to enter an advanced college science program.

Technology: By completing courses in fine arts and computer science, students will develop a deeper understanding of computer systems and be able to use and apply computer software skills in CAD and other software and be able to use industrial equipment to design and build 3-D objects, models, or robots.

Engineering: By learning and applying the Engineering Design Process in mathematics and science courses, students will be able to identify a problem, create a solution, and test it.

Mathematics: By completing four years of mathematics courses, including Advanced Pre-calculus, Pre-calculus, or AP Calculus, students will be able to enter Calculus I or Calculus II in first-year college programs. 


Science Requirements

Four years of science including one AP science course (AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Physics I, or AP Physics II) with a minimum grade of C.

Technology/Engineering Requirements

Completion of at least two trimesters from any of the following technology courses with a minimum grade of C:

Mathematics Requirements

Four years of mathematics including the completion of Pre-Calculus or Advanced Pre-Calculus, with Calculus, AP Calculus, or AP Statistics, with a minimum grade of C.

STEM Experience Requirements

  1. Job Shadow with a scientist, engineer, dentist, physician, or similar professional in the area of science, mathematics, or technology (6 hour minimum)
  2. All students must complete two additional STEM experiences from the following list:

Communication Requirements

It is important that all STEM students be able to communicate their experiences to others.


Using and exploring creativity is essential. For related coursework, try: Introduction to Drawing, Anatomy & Physiology, Engineering and Technology in Science, Public Speaking & Presentation Styles, Speech Team, Moral Philosophy, Music, Starlight Productions- Set Design.



World Language Certificates & Seals

The Academy of Holy Angels and the Minnesota Department of Education would like to recognize the superior efforts of our students who achieve bilingual or multilingual proficiency before graduation.

By demonstrating proficiency via a few approved testing protocols (including the AP test), students may receive a certificate of recognition and a seal of proficiency on their high school diploma.  This designation will also appear on their high school transcript to demonstrate to colleges a unique skillset.

Students who wish to be recognized for their multilingual proficiency may accomplish their second (or additional) language knowledge via Holy Angels coursework or any other source.  This could be via after hours schooling, past native or travel experience, or by speaking languages other than English at home.

Students who take a World Language Advanced Placement course already pay fees for the AP test.  Beyond successful achievement on the AP test, there is no further cost to receive the certificate or seal. 

For other students who wish to receive certification, an additional outside proficiency test (such as the AAPPL or STAMP) must be arranged and administered.  Approximate costs are $20 to $27, depending on the test.  There is no further cost for the certificate or seal.

Students can receive information and be invited by their World Language instructor or other Holy Angels staff to take part in appropriate testing to demonstrate proficiency and receive recognition.

MNSCU colleges may grant from two to four semester credits for college level language courses, depending on the proficiency level of the student.  Students should work closely with their college and career counselor to understand the benefits and financial implications of requesting such credit.  Students must work directly with their chosen university to request the credit. 



Theater School

General Description

The Academy of Holy Angels Theater School is a four-year academic program for theater within the general curriculum. It is designed so that students in the program fulfill all general requirements for graduation from the Academy while focusing their elective credits in the theater curriculum and related studies. Students are free to enter the program at any time in their four years at AHA, depending on previous experience and courses completed. Students entering at ninth grade enter at level I. 

AHA Theater ProgramCourse of Study

Acting Track

  • Introduction to Theatrical Arts*
  • Acting I: Contemporary Scene Study*
  • Acting II: Shakespearean Scene Study
  • Acting III: Accelerated Scene Study
  • Audition Techniques
  • Theater Design and Technical Production*
  • Public Speaking
  • Media Studies
  • Dance and Movement* (Physical Education) 

Design/Technical Track

  • Introduction to Theatrical Arts*
  • Acting I: Contemporary Scene Study*
  • Design Technology: Woods I
  • Computer Aided Drafting
  • Theater Design and Technical Production*
  • Introduction to Drawing
  • Introduction to Painting
  • Studio Drawing or Studio Painting
  • Design Technology: Woods II or Architectural Model Building

*Denotes courses required of all Theater School Students 


 

Level I:     2 Credits

Level II:    2-3 Credits

Level III:   3-5 Credits

Level IV:   Students in the fourth level have a variety of options:

      • Complete required course work
      • Introduction to Directing
      • Design and execute a Senior Project as an independent-study credit (must be arranged a year in advance)

Examples: Senior Showcase, internship with a professional theater company, design and execute set or lighting for AHA production, stage manage an AHA production. 

 

 

 

 

 



Writing Across the Curriculum

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) is a program unique to AHA that encourages student writing in all disciplines. All teachers assign writing appropriate to their curriculum. Students collect and file four or more pieces of their own writing from several subject areas each year and keep these pieces in folders in their homerooms. Requirements and options vary for each grade level. Before graduation, students participate in writing conferences, one-on-one, with faculty and staff and then take possession of their portfolios.

Writing Across Curriculum Evaluation AHA believes that writing clearly and concisely is a basic skill that our students should master to further their studies and to communicate effectively in a global society. In addition, the WAC program demonstrates that course content, process, and product are interdependent and equally important. Writing is not only a mechanical skill our graduates should achieve but also a lifelong skill that they should continue to develop.

To meet this goal, WAC encourages students to revise and evaluate their own writing. We want to foster in students a responsibility for their own skill development independent of teachers’ assessments. Portfolio options are further intended to encourage writing for pleasure. By having their writing samples accumulate in one place, students can reflect on their personal growth. The WAC program is immensely successful and rewarding for students.

A completed writing portfolio is a graduation requirement. Students must be complete in their portfolios at the end of each year to be eligible to participate in co-curricular activities. 

 



Course Descriptions by Academic Department

English

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

12 credits required for graduation

 

 

 

Required courses:

 

 

 

English 9, or

English 10 or

English 11 or

English 12 or

Advanced English 9

Advanced English 10

AP English Language and Composition

AP English Literature and Composition


English Department Philosophy

The English Department is a vital part of the educational program. We are committed to providing our students with instruction that is consistent and supportive of our Catholic Christian values. Rooted in AHA's mission, we strive to educate the whole student: intellectually, spiritually, morally, and emotionally.

The English Department plays a primary role in preparing our students for the world outside of school. Thus, we challenge our students to use the study of literature and language to become responsible, moral, and faith-committed members of their society. The study of literature shows students the relevance of the human experience to their own lives and exposes them to the rich cultural diversity that surrounds them. Instilling a love for reading and an appreciation of language in our students is a prime goal of the department. We encourage our students to be active participants in the learning process and to question themselves, their instructors, and each other. Our students learn to promote change rather than to accept life passively, particularly where it concerns the welfare of others.

To ensure that our students will be successful in the future, we teach effective written and oral communication skills. Realizing that the world is ever changing, instructors attempt to give their students the tools that they will need to speak articulately; to write clearly for various audiences; to use technology effectively and ethically; and to think critically, analytically, and creatively. Our goal is to create life-long learners.

Department Learner Outcomes:

Upon graduation students will:

The Writing Across the Curriculum description can be found in Special Academic Programs.


English 9

3 credits

Prerequisites: None

English 9 is for all freshmen not enrolled in Advanced English 9.

English 9 features an integrated study of grammar and proper writing mechanics, which will be demonstrated in writing throughout a student’s career at the Academy of Holy Angels. The students will study Greek and Roman mythology in order to recognize literary allusions and references in future literary works. The students will utilize research and organizational skills and demonstrate what they have learned by performing a minimum of two speeches in front of their respective classes. Students will read and analyze short stories and poetry as well as major works of Farah Ahmedi, Charles Dickens, Sandra Benitez, Chaim Potok, Harper Lee, Lorraine Hansberry, and William Shakespeare. Literature units will include analysis and the writing of five-paragraph themes.

Learner Outcomes:


Advanced English 9

3 credits

Students must maintain a “C” average to remain in Advanced English.

Prerequisites: A student considering Advanced English 9 should excel in English, have a grade of A in English 8, and have a score in the 90th percentile on the placement exam or take the AHA English placement offered in the spring of the eighth grade year.

Advantages: Weighted grade; Advanced Placement tests junior and/or senior year

This is a class for a student who truly loves to read and enjoys studying literature and writing, possesses analytical skills, and likes working independently on challenging material. Advanced English 9 offers an in-depth study of Shakespeare, Sophocles, modern and classic novels, plays, poetry, mythology, and short stories. There is intense study of grammar and usage. The class focuses on writing and critical thinking skills. Students are expected to read assigned texts during major school vacations.

Learner Outcomes:


AHA English DepartmentEnglish 10

3 credits

Prerequisites: None

English 10 is for sophomores not enrolled in Advanced English 10.

English 10 is composition and literature-based with emphasis on vocabulary, proper writing mechanics, grammar, and literary elements. Students will examine diverse literature including Greek, American, British, and world texts. Selections may include: Catcher in the Rye, Oedipus the King, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Bean Trees, Lord of the Flies, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, short stories, and poetry. Students will also write a formal research paper, working on it throughout one trimester. The course lays the foundation for English 11 and 12.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Advanced English 10

3 credits

Students must maintain a “C” average to remain in Advanced English.

Prerequisites: Advanced English 9 or an A in English 9, teacher recommendation, required additional outside reading to transition to the Advanced track.

Advantages: Weighted grade; Advanced Placement tests in junior and/or senior year

Advanced English 10 begins with the history and literature of ancient England with Beowulf and continues with Chaucer and Malory. It includes writers from the Renaissance, the Age of Reason, Romantic era, and the Victorians. Most selections are poetry and essays; however, the course also includes novels and plays by Shelley, Wilde, Austen, and Shaw. Shakespeare’s Macbeth is read and analyzed. The students write several essays of literary analysis, a formal research paper, and creative prose.

Students are expected to read assigned novels during major school vacations. They will sharpen their oral and written communication skills as they read, discuss, react, and support their opinions, write compositions, and work cooperatively with their peers. 

Learner Outcomes:


English 11

3 credits

Prerequisites: None

English 11 is for all juniors not enrolled in AP English 11.

This chronological survey of American literature allows students the opportunity to appreciate and understand their literary heritage as they make connections between the past and present. Trimester one begins with short selections from early American literature and The Scarlet Letter, and continues with poetry and selections from the Literary Nationalist era and America’s Golden Era.

Trimesters two and three cover mid-19th century to the 20th century as students read short stories and novels.

Modern literature includes The Great Gatsby (1925), The Harvest Gypsies (1930s), Death of a Salesman (1940s), Fences (1950s), Fools Crow (1986) and excerpts from The Things They Carried (1990). Students will sharpen their oral and written communication skills as they read, discuss, react and support their opinions, write, and work cooperatively with others.

Learner Outcomes:


AP English Language and Composition

3 credits

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in AP English Language and Composition.

Prerequisites: Advanced English 9, Advanced English 10, or an A average in English and teacher recommendation with required outside reading to transition into the AP track.

Advantages: Advanced Placement Exam in Language and Composition offered in May; College credit through PACC; Weighted grade

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

This class is for the serious, dedicated English student. Highly demanding, the course is taught as a college course. The student should be able to work independently on both in class and out of class reading and writing assignments. AP English Language and Composition will focus primarily on rhetoric, a survey of American literature and history, and nonfiction.

The class will concentrate on critical reading and rhetorical and stylistic analysis. The goal is to create strong writers. Students will write essays of all types: argumentative, expository, analytical, and personal. They will study a wide variety of forms of literature. They will become familiar with prose from various time periods, disciplines, and rhetorical situations. Instruction includes AP Language and Composition test preparation. Students are expected to read assigned novel or play during major school vacations.

Learner Outcomes:

 


English 12

3 credits

Grade Level: 12

For all seniors: this class emphasizes skills that students will need in college courses.

The course will examine the literature of the world thematically. Trimester I will examine universal parallels of a hero through the study of The Iliad, The Aeneid, and other epics. Trimester I will also focus on the theme of foolishness and trickery. Trimester II and III will include a close study of Shakespeare’s Othello and focus on themes of the reversal of fortune, the power of love, and tyranny and freedom using works by Lessing, Wiesel, Ibsen, Sophocles, Coelho, and many others. The course will incorporate background on the cultural values and context of the works.

Learner Outcomes


AP English Literature and Composition

3 credits

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in AP English Literature and Composition.

Prerequisites:  Advanced English 9, Advanced English 10, AP English Language and Composition, or an A average in English and teacher recommendation with required outside reading to transition into the AP track.

Advantages: Advanced Placement in Literature and Composition exam offered in May; college credit through PACC; weighted grade

For the serious, dedicated English student. Highly demanding, the course operates as a college course.

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

AP English Literature and Composition examines major pieces of world literature ranging from the classical to the modern. Students will read, discuss and analyze, and write about works by Shakespeare, Voltaire, Beckett, Camus, Sartre, Dostoyevsky, and many others. Additionally, students will study modern poetry and short stories. Writing will be a major component of study, and students will receive instruction in various forms of prose styles. Instruction will include AP Literature and Composition test preparation. Students are expected to read assigned novels during major school vacations.

Learner Outcomes:



Fine Arts

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

Visual Arts

 

 

 

Introduction to Ceramics

 Introduction to Ceramics

Introduction to Ceramics

Introduction to Ceramics 

Introduction to Drawing

Introduction to Drawing

Introduction to Drawing

Introduction to Drawing

Introduction to Painting

Introduction to Painting

Introduction to Painting

Introduction to Painting

Introduction to Digital Photography

Introduction to Digital Photography

Introduction to Digital Photography

Introduction to Digital Photography

Studio Ceramics

Studio Ceramics

Studio Ceramics

Studio Ceramics

Studio Art

Studio Art

Studio Art

Studio Art

Computer Art

Computer Art

Computer Art

Computer Art

   

AP Studio Art

AP Studio Art

Music

     

Concert Band/Phy Ed*

Concert Band

Concert Band

Concert Band

Concert Choir/Phy Ed*

Concert Choir

Concert Choir

Concert Choir

Theater/Communications

     

Introduction to Theatrical Arts

Introduction to Theatrical Arts

Introduction to Theatrical Arts

Introduction to Theatrical Arts

Theater Design and Technical Production

Theater Design and Technical Production

Theater Design and Technical Production

Theater Design and Technical Production

Acting I: Contemporary Scene Study

Acting I: Contemporary Scene Study

Acting I: Contemporary Scene Study

Acting I: Contemporary Scene Study

Acting II: Shakespearean Scene Study

Acting II: Shakespearean Scene Study

Acting II: Shakespearean Scene Study

Acting II: Shakespearean Scene Study

 

Acting III: Accelerated Scene Study

Acting III: Accelerated Scene Study

Acting III: Accelerated Scene Study

 Audition Techniques

Audition Techniques 

Audition Techniques

Audition Techniques

 

 

 

Introduction to Directing

 

Media Studies

Media Studies

Media Studies

 

Public Speaking and Presentational Styles

Public Speaking and Presentational Styles

Public Speaking and Presentational Styles

*In 9th grade, students take band or choir in conjunction with Physical Education (Phy Ed).

AHA Fine Arts Philosophy

The Fine Arts Department fulfills the mission of educating the whole person by providing students a variety of opportunities in both performing and studio arts. The Department develops critical thinking skills, increases communication abilities and culti- vates academic and aesthetic literacy. 

The Fine Arts Department develops critical thinking skills, increases communication abilities and cultivates academic and aesthetic literacy.

The Theater School description can be found in Special Academic Programs.


Visual Arts Courses


Intro to CeramicsIntroduction to Ceramics

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Note: $10 supply fee

This class is for the student who enjoys working in the three-dimensional medium of clay.

Introduction to Ceramics concentrates on making pottery using the fundamental processes of pinching, coiling, and joining slabs of clay. A clay whistle will also be made which will introduce the additive sculpture process. Subtractive sculpture will be introduced and executed with a plaster-carving project. The Elements of Art and the Principles of Design as they relate to pottery will be covered. Also a glossary of ceramics terms and investigation of other basic ceramic processes will be covered.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Introduction to Drawing

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

This class is for students who are serious about improving and understanding their own creative process. Drawing is a skill basic to all art. The most important factor in learning to draw is learning how to see the way an artist sees. Through mental and drawing exercises students will develop their ability to see, perceive, and think as an artist does. Students will explore and stretch to discover the artist residing within. The course requires an open and willing mind.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Introduction to Painting

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

This class is for students with an interest in painting as a form of self expression who wish to further develop their visual sense.

This is an introductory course designed to give the student exposure to and experience in the fundamentals of mechanics of painting as well as also the creative process as a means to innovation. The course will be divided into two main mediums - watercolors and acrylics. Common and individual characteristics will be examined. Students will explore and discover their own artistic process within in a studio environment. The course requires an open and willing mind.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Introduction to Digital Photography

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Other requirements: Students are encouraged to provide a working digital SLR camera. If a camera is not available to the student, one will be provided on a project by project basis.

This class is for the student who wishes to explore expression through the camera, enjoys observing the world, and has an interest in photography.

Digital Photography not only concentrates on the craft of digital photography but also emphasizes learning to develop an artistic eye using the media of photography. Students will develop an artistic vocabulary dealing with the elements and principles of art, composition, history and criticism.

Photo assignments will include the themes of emphasis, visual dynamics, light and shadow, and stylistic re-creations of a photographer of the student’s choice. Instruction and lecture on the mechanics of a digital single-lens reflex (SLR) camera, the development of RAW photos in Photoshop, photo compositing, photo illustration and much more.

Though there will be few homework assignments, students should be prepared to shoot photos outside of school on their own time. It is imperative that students shoot photos in a timely manner in order to complete in-class coursework.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:


 

Computer Art

1 credit--Fine Arts or Technology

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

This class is for students with an interest in the visual arts and for students who enjoy hands-on, project-based, independent work, using the computer as a tool. The computer has found its way into every aspect of people’s lives. In the art world, the computer’s capabilities have just begun to be explored. Painting is a skill basic to all visual art, and using the computer to paint is a new, exciting way to learn the basics of artistic communication.

Using this new medium, the student will explore new realms of self expression, while developing an artist’s eye and vocabulary. Students will explore the capabilities of the computer in creating this new breed of art and gain a foundation in the visual arts.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:


Studio Ceramics

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Ceramics and permission of the instructor

Note: $10 supply fee

This class is for the student who has patience, perseverance, determination, and the strong work ethic that wheel-thrown pottery demands in order to be successful. Anyone wishing to take this course must be willing to trim their fingernails short for proper technique.

The primary focus of Studio Ceramics is learning to “throw” symmetrical pottery on the potter’s wheel. Assignments will progress from bowls, to cylinders, to mugs with handles, pitchers and bottles. Related processes and techniques covered will be wedging of clay, trimming pots, and making handles. Discussion of how the form of a pot and its function relate will be an integral part of the course. If a student wishes to explore clay sculpture, they may discuss their ideas with the instructor.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:


 

Studio Art

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Any Introductory Visual Arts Class: Introduction to Drawing, Introduction to Painting, Introduction to Digital Photography, or Computer Art

The studio level is the next step after the introductory class. The emphasis is on the process of making 2D Art. Course work provides an in-depth, project-based experience using a range of mediums, including drawing, painting and photography. Students interested in further study of ceramics should take Studio Ceramics. This class is for students who have a serious interest in art making as a form of self-expression and who wish to further develop their visual sense. There is a concentration on expanding the personal creative process, knowledge and understanding. Common and individual characteristics will be explored. Self-expression will be emphasized. 

Learner Outcomes: 

Students will: 


AP Studio Art

3 credits

Grade level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Studio level course in the Visual Arts discipline of interest. Enrollment is by application process completed in January of the previous school year. Previous work, work ethic, and desire to achieve are taken into consideration.

Advantages: Students may submit a portfolio for AP college credit. Weighted grade.

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

This is a college-level course intended for the serious-minded art student. It is rigorous preparation for the AP Art submission or for a college admissions portfolio. Students must be self-motivated and have the ability to work independently. Students will deepen and solidify their understanding of the process of creating art. The enrollment process will be by an instructor interview on a student-by-student basis.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Music Courses


Concert Band

3 credits

Grade levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: A minimum of two years experience playing a band instrument. Students with no previous experience should contact the band director prior to enrollment.

This course is for woodwind, brass, and percussion students interested in continuing their instrumental music performance and study.

Students will gain experience in a variety of styles and structures of music through playing, listening, and writing. Classes include technical studies and repertoire preparation for individuals, sections, and the entire ensemble. Students are expected to participate in rehearsals and concerts. The Concert Band is a performing group.

Learner Outcomes:

Students interested in Concert Band are encouraged to contact the band director to discuss scheduling options.

Ninth grade students will take Concert Band in conjunction with their ninth grade Physical Education class.

 


Concert Choir

3 credits

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

The Concert Choir is open to any student at Holy Angels who wants to sing. Daily rehearsals will involve warm-up activities, developing a blended choral sound, sight-singing, ear-training exercises and music reading work. The Concert Choir is a SATB ensemble that will perform at regularly scheduled concerts and events. Choir students will experience a variety of styles and structures of music through singing, listening, and written work.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

Students interested in Concert Choir are encouraged to contact the choir director to discuss scheduling options.

Ninth grade students will take Concert Choir in conjunction with their ninth grade Physical Education class. 


Theater/Communications 


Introduction to Theatrical Arts

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

Introduction to Theatrical Arts is for students who wish to be more knowledgeable about theater from an audience perspective. It offers an overview of the art form in which students will gain an appreciation of theater by exploring the various elements that create theater. Students will learn what to look for when in the audience of a theatrical event and learn how to effectively critique theater.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Theater Design and Technical Production

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

Theater Design and Technical Production explores the artistry and craft of the production process. From page to stage, students will examine how set, lighting, and prop design enhance storytelling onstage.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Acting I: Contemporary Scene Study

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

Acting I is for students who are interested in beginning their study of acting by preparing and performing a variety of scenes and monologues from contemporary dramatic literature. This is a course that requires active participation and daily performances.

Acting I is a lab course with the majority of the work being done in class. Areas covered include contemporary scene study, monologue preparation, character analysis, script analysis, acting styles and audition techniques.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Acting II: Shakespearean Scene Study

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Acting I or permission of Theater Director

Acting II is a lab class for highly motivated students who are interested in studying and performing scenes from Shakespearean plays.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Acting III: Accelerated Scene Study

1 credit

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Acting I and II and approval of the Theater Director

This lab course is for serious theater students who want to further their study of scene study through independent research and advanced scene and character analysis.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Public Speaking and Presentational Styles

1 credit

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

This class is for students interested in learning and improving their public speaking skills. Students will learn the elements of effective public speaking and the preparation and presentation of persuasive, informative, discussion, extemporaneous, and motivational speeches. Students will explore the use of multimedia in its application for public speaking.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 

 


Audition Techniques

1 credit

Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

Audition Techniques is a course for the serious theater student who seeks to improve audition techniques through active presentations of prepared monologues and cold reading experiences.

Students will study and prepare audition pieces that can be used in the professional theater. Students will also explore techniques for film, television and commercial industry.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Introduction to Directing

1 credit

Grade Levels: 12

Prerequisites: Acting I and permission of the instructor

Introduction to Directing is for the serious theater student who would like the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of directing for the stage. Students will work with Acting I students to produce scenes from contemporary dramatic literature. Areas studied include script analysis, blocking, motivation and script selection.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Media Studies

1 credit

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

Media Studies is for students who are interested in studying and evaluating various forms of media communication.

This is an excellent class for any student who enjoys discussion and critique. Students study the symbolic nature of language in the media and how it is used in advertising, religion, politics and other forms of public discourse. Students will prepare both formal and informal critiques and present them in written and verbal formats.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:



Mathematics

Requirements

Three credits--grade 9
Six additional credits beyond grade 9 for graduation


Math Department Courses

*Students enrolling in mathematics have a series of options. This chart outlines the potential paths in mathematics that are open to them as they progress through high school. (Please note that these paths are not prescribed or required. Students may move between paths as their skills in math emerge.) Placement is made taking into consideration student academic goals, middle school grades and course work, placement test scores, parent recommendations and the spring AHA placement exam.

Department Philosophy

As mathematics instructors, we strive to provide a learning environment that promotes academic excellence and recognizes each student’s needs and capabilities in mathematics. As a result, students will acquire mathematical skills and improve basic reasoning processes to face challenges and solve problems.

We work with the guidance counselors to provide academic and career counseling for students, update and improve our curriculum, and educate ourselves in current research and methodology.

General Information

The Academy of Holy Angels offers a comprehensive program in mathematics. Because there is a great need for critical, quantitative thinking and problem solving ability in our highly technological society, the graduation requirement is nine trimesters. Most colleges require Intermediate Algebra, Geometry and Algebra II for admission.

The mathematics curriculum is not broken into rigid tracks, but is a flexible plan based upon students’ needs and abilities. As students progress, their performance is regularly evaluated by their teachers, parents or guardians and the students themselves. On the basis of this regular evaluation, students may elect to take a math course more appropriate to individual ability. In order to continue the next trimester, a student must pass the current trimester in that course. Students in “Advanced” courses or AP Calculus or AP Statistics must earn at least a C each trimester to continue in the course.

Graphing calculators and computers will be used in courses for which they are appropriate. The TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84 or the TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required for courses using the graphing calculator. These models are used for instruction, and their operation is explained in classes using them.

Additional mathematics options

Students interested in other applications of mathematics may consider the courses listed below:

The STEM diploma description can be found in Special Academic Programs.


Intermediate Algebra

3 credits

Grade Level: 9, 10

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I in eighth grade and recommended score of 70 percent (National Percentile) or higher on high school placement test.

This course is intended for students who have been successful in eighth grade algebra or geometry. It is a review of the basic principles of algebra and an extension of these as they apply to new topics.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84 or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Advanced Intermediate Algebra

3 credits

Grade Level: 9

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I in eighth grade and recommended score of 85 percent (National Percentile) or higher on high school placement test. A reading score of 75 percent (National Percentile) or higher is also recommended

This course is intended for the above-average serious student who is motivated, responsible and able to learn at a fast pace.

This is the same course as Intermediate Algebra but moves faster and covers material in more depth with an emphasis on problem solving and concept mastery.

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84 or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Intermediate Algebra Concepts

3 credits

Grade Level: 9

Prerequisite: Completion of eighth-grade algebra

This course is intended for students who would benefit from smaller classes sizes and more one-to-one teacher attention to master mathematical/algebraic concepts. It is a review of the basic principles of algebra and an extension of these as they apply to new topics. This course does not qualify for NCAA credit.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84 or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Geometry

3 credits

Grade Level:  10

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intermediate Algebra

This course introduces the concepts of plane, solid and coordinate geometry. Logical reasoning and critical thinking are emphasized through connections to algebra and real life applications. Formal proof and geometric probability are introduced.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84 or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Advanced Geometry

3 credits

Grade Level: 9, 10

Prerequisite:    Ninth grade: recommended 90 percent or higher on high school placement test; completion of Algebra I; pass the Academy of Holy Angels algebra proficiency examination and department recommendation. Tenth grade: Successful completion of Advanced Intermediate Algebra and department approval

This course is intended for highly interested, mature, responsible and serious students who are able to learn at a fast pace. Students are expected to have mastered and be able to use skills from Algebra I. This course may be taken concurrently with Advanced Algebra II.

This course is the same as Geometry, but it covers material in greater depth and extensively uses formal proof to develop logical reasoning skills. Trigonometry is introduced.

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84 or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Accelerated Advanced Geometry/ Algebra II

3 credits

Grade Level: 9, 10

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Intermediate Algebra and department recommendation

This rigorous course is intended for mature, responsible, serious students who have a high interest in mathematics and are able to learn at a very fast pace. Students are expected to have mastered and be able to use skills from Advanced Intermediate Algebra.

This course combines key concepts from Advanced Geometry and Advanced Algebra II and will prepare students for Advanced Pre-Calculus. Formal proof is used to develop logical reasoning skills. Trigonometry is introduced.

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84 or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required. 

 


Geometry Concepts

3 credits

Grade Level: 10

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intermediate Algebra Concepts

This course is intended for students who would benefit from smaller classes sizes and more one-to-one teacher attention to master mathematical concepts.

This course offers an integrated view of geometry with algebra, science, social studies and art. Real world applications are emphasized. This course does not qualify for NCAA credit.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Algebra II

3 credits

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intermediate Algebra and Geometry

This course is a review of concepts presented in Intermediate Algebra and an extension of these as they apply to new topics. Statistics is introduced throughout the year.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Advanced Algebra II

3 credits

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11

Prerequisite:   Successful completion of Advanced Intermediate Algebra, Advanced Geometry, and department recommendation

Ninth grade: Very high interest in mathematics. Successful completion of Advanced Intermediate Algebra, Advanced Geometry, and recommended score of 90 percent (national per- centile) on high school placement test; pass the Academy of Holy Angels algebra and geometry proficiency examinations and department recommendation.

This rigorous course is the same as Algebra II except that it covers material in more depth and at a faster pace. Trimester 3 includes trigonometry. This course may be taken concurrently with Advanced Geometry.

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required. 

 


Algebra II Concepts

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intermediate Algebra Concepts and Geometry Concepts

This course is intended for students who would benefit from smaller classes sizes and more one-to-one teacher attention to master mathematical concepts. This course does not qualify for NCAA credit.

This course will review and extend topics from Intermediate Algebra Concepts. Applications of algebra will be emphasized.

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Pre-Calculus

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or Advanced Algebra II and department recommendation

This is a course in advanced mathematics designed for college-bound students in mathematics or science related fields. It will review and extend topics from Algebra II. Functions, conic sections, and trigonometry are studied as well.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Advanced Pre-Calculus

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra II or Accelerated Advanced Geometry/Algebra II and department recommendation

This is a rigorous course in advanced mathematics designed for students college-bound for math- or science-oriented fields. This course will prepare students for AP Calculus. It will review and extend topics from Advanced Algebra II and may be taken concurrently with AP Statistics.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required. 

 


Introduction to Calculus

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus or Advanced Pre-Calculus and department recommendation

This class is similar to the first half of a college calculus course.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


AP Calculus AB

3 credits

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Pre-Calculus and department recommendation.

This rigorous course involves a discussion of limits, derivatives, the integral and their applications.

Students enrolled in AP Calculus will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

This course may be taken for college credit through St. Mary’s University PACC program. Since this is an AP course, grades are weighted as an “Advanced” course.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


AP Statistics

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Grade 11 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra II and concurrent enrollment in Advanced Pre- Calculus or AP Calculus and department recommendation

Grade 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus and department recommendation

This rigorous course explores data by observing patterns and departures from patterns. Students will develop skills in anticipating patterns, applying appropriate statistical methods, using probabilities, planning statistical studies and using statistical inference. This course may be taken concurrently with Advanced Pre-Calculus or AP Calculus.

Students enrolled in AP Statistics will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

May be taken for college credit through St. Mary’s University PACC program. This is an AP course, and grades are weighted as “Advanced”.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Survey of Mathematics

3 credits

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II Concepts and department recommendation

This course is designed for students who need extra time to master mathematical concepts and desire practical application of basic mathematics, geometry and algebra skills. Students will be expected to complete daily homework. Applications of mathematics in the arts, sciences, and business are examined. This course does not qualify for NCAA credit.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

 


Problem Solving & Statistics

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or Pre-Calculus and department recommendation

For students who have successfully completed Algebra II or Pre-Calculus and are seeking additional mathematical studies, this course explores problem solving strategies which prepares them to meet challenges and gain confidence. Data sets and statistics are explored in the context of daily living.

Students will:

TI-83, TI-83 Plus, TI-84, or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required. 



Physical Education and Health

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

Required

Required

Required

Required

Online Health

Online Health

Online Health

Online Health

Grade 9 Physical Education

Two Physical Education electives

   
 

Elective

Elective

Elective

 

Dance and Movement

Dance and Movement

Dance and Movement

 

Racquet/Individual and Dual Sports

Racquet/Individual and Dual Sports

Racquet/Individual and Dual Sports

 

Strength and Conditioning

Strength and Conditioning

Strength and Conditioning

 

Team Sports

Competition Sports

Competition Sports

   

Other

Other

   

Living on Your Own

Living on Your Own


Department Philosophy

It is the objective of the Physical Education Program at AHA to provide students with academic knowledge and physical skills to enable them to participate successfully in lifetime fitness and leisure activities.

Personal fitness tests are part of physical education classes at AHA. Tests that may be conducted are: body mass, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, and agility. This information is personal and will be kept confidential.

Outcomes


Required Courses


Online Health

Online Health is a required 1 credit course taken all four years. The description can be found in Special Academic Programs.

Grade 9 Physical Education

1 credit

Grade Level: 9

This course will consist of both team and individual/dual sports as well as lifetime activities. Activities covered will be “in season.” Trimester one will mirror the fall sports season, trimester two – the winter season, and trimester three – the spring season.

Each ninth grade course will begin with an introduction to personal fitness.

Learner Outcomes:

 

Elective Courses


Dance and Movement

1 credit

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Come and explore the wonderful world of dance! Capture the excitement of the 30s and 40s with music from the big band era. While this is primarily a beginning course, students of all experience levels are encouraged to enroll.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Racquet/Individual and Dual Sports

1 credit

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

This course is designed for the student who enjoys individual and dual activities.

Racquet sports are highlighted, e.g. badminton, table tennis, pickle ball, tennis (in season). Spikeball, golf, frisbee golf, bocce ball, cross-country skiing (in season) are also featured units of this course.

Activities covered will include rules, skill development and strategies for fundamental mastery. Emphasis of each trimester will be the sports and activities in season.

Tournaments and competitions will be a part of this course.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Strength and Conditioning

1 credit

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

This course will be an introduction into the basic principles and techniques of strength training, plyometrics, and cross training activities.

Learner Outcomes:


Team Sports

1 credit

Grade Level: 10

This course is designed for the student who enjoys team activities. Emphasis of each trimester will be on the sports and activities in season. Tournaments and competitions will be part of this course.

Learner Outcomes:


Competition Sports

1 credit

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

This course is designed for the individual who enjoys high energy, serious competition. Class will include game strategy, fundamentals, basics of officiating, and competition played under federation rules.

Sports include touch football, soccer, floor hockey, badminton, ultimate frisbee, basketball, and others.

This course may be taken for credit more than once.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Living on Your Own

1 credit

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

Before you know it, you’ll be moving into an apartment, learning to live with roommates and making major financial decisions. Living on your own can be an exciting time, but you want to be prepared. In this practical course, you’ll learn the fundamentals of personal/family resource management and practice informed decision making.

Areas of study include housing to fit personal needs, job search and interview, personal finance and budgeting, car purchasing and maintenance, checking accounts, using credit wisely, tax filing procedures, wise grocery shopping, quick and nutritious meals, and management of personal resources.

Learner Outcomes:

Note: Although it’s listed in the Physical Education section, Living on Your Own is not a physical education course. Credits earned in this class will be listed as general elective credits.



Science

Requirements

A minimum of nine credits in science is required for graduation including:
                     -three credits in biology 
                     -three credits in chemistry
                     -three credits in physics 

Science Chart 2019

College Credit

Juniors and seniors enrolled in AP Biology and AP Chemistry, can apply for college credit through the St. Mary’s University of Minnesota PACC Program.

Science Department Philosophy

The Science Department at the Academy of Holy Angels strives to develop scientifically literate students through a systematic study of the world around us. Through this, the department hopes to instill an appreciation for the wonders of the world and enable students of all abilities and learning styles to experience success in the science classroom.

Department Learner Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

The STEM diploma description can be found in Special Academic Programs.


Pre-Engineering

The AHA Science Department agrees with ABET (The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology), the leading authority in engineering education that the best high school preparation for a career in engineering includes a strong background in science and math. In addition to traditional courses, ABET suggests a focus on communication skills, a commitment to lifelong learning, an appreciation for cultural diversity, and the ability to drive change.

For students interested in a career in engineering, AHA offers the following sequence of courses:

Normal Sequence

   

Grade

Science

Math

9

Biology

Intermediate Algebra

10

Chemistry

Geometry

11

Physics

Algebra II

12

Elective

Pre-Calculus

Accelerated Sequence

   

Grade

Science

Math

9

Pre-AP Biology

Advanced Intermediate Algebra

10

Pre-AP Chemistry

Advanced/Accelerated Geometry/Algebra II

11

AP Chemistry/AP Biology

Advanced Pre-Calculus

12

AP Physics I

AP Calculus

Writing and Communications: Students interested in preparing for college engineering programs should take Public Speaking and Presentational Styles in addition to the required yearly English courses.

Suggested key electives: Computer Art, Computer-Aided Drafting, Computer Science. 

 


Biology

3 credits

Grade Level: 9

Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory course to the biological sciences. Students will explore the world of living organisms and develop an understanding of how biology applies to everyday life. In this course, students will cover the following topics: biochemistry, the cell, cell metabolism, cell reproduction, DNA function/replication, genetics, protein synthesis, ecology, evolution, and biotechnology.

Learning Outcomes:

 


A note about Advanced Placement (AP) classes


AP science courses are extremely rigorous, with rigorous homework weekly. It is advisable for the student and family to carefully consider the amount of time that will be available for the student’s classwork and co-curricular activities. 


Pre-AP Biology

3 credits

Grade Level: 9

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in the class.

Prerequisite: Passing score on Physical Science Proficiency Test or 90% on the entrance test science section, concurrent enrollment in Advanced Intermediate Algebra I or higher, and instructor approval.

This course is designed to be an introductory Biology class which will serve as the first-year course for those students who may plan to take the AP Biology course their junior or senior year at Holy Angels. In this course, students will cover the following topics: biochemistry, the cell, cell metabolism, cell reproduction, DNA function/ replication, genetics, protein synthesis, ecology, animal behavior, evolution, and biotechnology.

Learner Outcomes:

 


AP Biology

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in the class.

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Biology and Pre-AP Chemistry, with a C+ average in both and instructor approval. (Upon instructor approval, students with a B+ average in Chemistry may be admitted.)

This is a second course in Biology to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Biology test. This course may be taken by juniors and seniors through St. Mary’s University for college credit. This is a rigorous course designed for the college-bound student who is considering majoring in medicine or other biological sciences. This course is for the self-motivated student who has a profound interest in biological sciences. Students will prepare for and take the AP exam in the spring. Students must purchase a college lab notebook for this class.

Successful completion of summer course work is required to be admitted to this class.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Engineering and Technology in Science

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Completion of one year of Biology and Chemistry.

Engineering and Technology in Science is a STEM based course designed to teach students the fundamentals of forensic science, DNA technologies, and environmental engineering.

Trimester 1: Forensic Science

The first trimester will focus on forensics, the application of science, engineering, and math for solving crimes. It will be rich in exploration and lab investigation which applies many disciplines of scientific study such as biology/anatomy, chemistry, and physics to solving crimes. Labs include crime scene and evidence collection, time of death analysis, fingerprint analysis and blood splatter analysis.

Learner Outcomes:

Trimester 2: DNA Technologies

The second trimester of the course is designed to give students a comprehensive introduction to the scientific concepts and laboratory research techniques currently used in the field of DNA technology such as DNA extraction, gel electrophoresis, and PCR. Students attain knowledge about the field of biotechnology and deeper understanding of the biological concepts used. In addition, students develop the laboratory, critical thinking, and communication skills currently used in the biotechnology industry. Furthermore, students will explore and evaluate career opportunities in the field of biotechnology through extensive readings, laboratory experiments, class discussions, and research projects.

Learner Outcomes:

Trimester 3: Environmental Engineering

The third trimester of the course will introduce the engineering and design process and the concepts of energy and energy issues focusing on sustainable and renewable energies such as ocean thermal technologies, wind power, biofuels, and solar energy. Projects include designing and testing passive solar homes, windmills, and will culminate in the design, construction, and testing of a solar boat that will compete in a solar boat regatta in May.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Physics

3 credits  

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

Physics is the study of the motion in the natural world and is required by several college majors including: engineering, physical therapy, and nursing. Topics covered through the year include: kinematics in two dimensions and three dimensions, work and energy, circular motion, momentum, electric fields, electric circuits, wave phenomenon, sound, properties of light, and geometric optics. In addition to learning the concepts of physics, students will develop logical problem-solving skills and improve science communication skills that can be applied to situations ouside of the classroom.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Conceptual Physics

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Teacher approval required for registration.

Physics is the study of the motion in the natural world and is required to develop 21st century STEM and lifelong learner skills. Topics covered through the year include: kinematics, work and energy, simple machines, circular motion, momentum, electric fields, electric circuits, wave phenomenon, sound, properties of light, and geomatric optics. In addition to learning the concepts of phsyics, students will develop logical problem-solving skills and improve science communication skills that can be applied to situations outside of the classroom.


AP Physics I

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in the class.

Prerequisite: Algebra II; Students must apply algebra to solving complex problems.

AP Physics I is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. Students are expected to be proficient in solving linear equations, working with ratios and proportions, and using basic trigonometry. Students will prepare for and take the AP Physics I exam in the spring for potential college credit.

Learner Outcomes:

 


AP Physics II

3 credits

Grade Level: 12

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in the class.

Prerequisite: Physics or AP Physics I (recommended)

AP Physics II is equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course builds on the existing physics knowledge students already have and covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics.

Students are expected to be proficient in physics concepts involving forces, centripetal motion, simple electric circuits, solving linear equations, working with ratios and proportions, using basic trigonometry, and logarithmic functions.

Students will prepare for and take the AP Physics II exam in the spring for potential college credit.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Chemistry

3 credits

Grade level: 10, 11

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Intermediate Algebra and Geometry. 

This course is for college-bound students desiring a strong background in science. Students should be self-motivated and like challenges. Problem solving skills are important, and will be developed through the year.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Pre-AP Chemistry

3 credits

Grade Level: 10, 11

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in the class.

Prerequisite: C+ average in Pre-AP Biology, and a grade of B+ or higher in Advanced Intermediate Algebra. Students must pass a math skills exam given in the spring prior to enrollment.

This is an in-depth and fast-paced study of the laws and principles of chemistry. Problem solving is integral. Explored comprehensively are atomic theory, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, bonding, molecular structure and geometry, periodicity, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, redox reactions, and descriptive chemistry. An extensive lab program reinforces the principles. A scientific graphing calculator and college lab notebook are required.

Learner Outcomes:

 



AP Chemistry

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in the class.

Prerequisites: Advanced Algebra II or Accelerated Advanced Geometry/Algebra II. An average grade of C+ or higher in Pre AP Chemistry. Concurrent registration in, or completion of, Advanced Algebra II and instructor permission are required. This class may be taken for college credit through the St. Mary’s University PACC program. Tuition fees for college credit will apply.

This college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination. Topics include: The structure of matter, gas laws, redox equations, thermodynamics, kinetics, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, equilibrium, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Descriptive chemistry is covered in depth and lab experiments reinforce the principles. Successful completion of the assigned summer work is required for admission. Studentsare expected to take the AP Chemistry exam in May. A graphing calculator is required. Students must purchase a college lab notebook for this class.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Anatomy and Physiology

3 credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Prerequisites: Completion of one year of Biology and Chemistry with a grade of C or better.

This course is for the student with a serious interest in the biological sciences and/or health careers. It builds on skills and knowledge gained in previously completed biology and chemistry courses. It provides an overview of the organ systems in the body as well as a look at how each system works down to the cellular level. It will provide a strong foundation for students going into medical fields. It is taught as a primer for a college anatomy course and will be offered for PACC credit through Saint Mary’s University. Students will study the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The course also includes the dissection of a cat.

Learner Outcomes:

 



Social Studies

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

Required:

 

Required:

Required:

World History & Geography

 

AP United States History or

Trimester 1: Economics

   

United States History

Trimester II: AP US Government & Politics (Two Trimesters) or US Government

     

Trimester III: AP US Government & Politics or Sociology or Contemporary World Affairs

Electives:

20th Century World Studies

20th Century World Studies

 
 

 AP Psychology (Two Trimesters)

AP Psychology

(Two Trimesters)

AP Psychology (Two Trimesters)

   

Sociology

Sociology 

   

Contemporary World Affairs

 Contemporary World Affairs

Department Philosophy

The Holy Angels Social Studies Department offers a wide selection of academic courses and experiences designed to help students acquire the knowledge and skills demanded by an increasingly interdependent world. Students are challenged to analyze, evaluate, and fully comprehend the many complicated factors that shape individuals and the larger communities to which they belong. We encourage our students to both respect tradition and continually seek opportunities to inspire positive changes locally and globally.

Department Outcomes:

Within the Social Studies Department, students will be able to: 

 


World History & Geography

3 credits

Grade Level: 9

A required course for 9th grade

World History is a year-long course that studies the emergence and development of eastern and western cultures. In the first trimester students will study the 5 Themes of Geography, ancient river civilizations, and the classical civilizations. During the second trimester students will examine developments in the Muslim, Byzantine, and East Asian Empires before investigating European societies from the Middle Ages to the rise of absolute monarchs. In the third trimester students will trace the impact of social and industrial revolutions on developing and non-developing nations. The course concludes with the study of the causes and impacts of World War I on the twentieth century.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Twentieth Century World Studies

1 credit

Grade Level: 10, 11

An elective for all sophomores or juniors who enjoy and appreciate the study of history.

This course has been designed to provide practicing historians with a provocative and engaging study of the people, places, events, and movements that shaped the Twentieth Century. Topics include the world at war, imperialism, independence movements, the influence of political ideologies ranging from communism to fascism, totalitarian regimes, the expansion of civil and human rights, religious fundamentalism, and the triumph of the individual. Students enhance their understanding of this tumultuous century by reading short novels and viewing feature films related to the course’s major themes. This elective class is offered to sophomores and juniors who have a particular interest in history and who are willing to take a non-traditional approach to learning about the past and present. This course is offered first trimester only.

Related skills:

Learner Outcomes:


AP United States History

3 credits

Grade Level: 11

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor; recommendations from two teachers (forms available in the Social Studies Department)

For college-bound, self-motivated juniors who have good reading and writing skills.

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

Advantages:

This is a rigorous college-level course. It uses a college textbook, which focuses on the issues and themes of the United States from the era of discovery and exploration to the present. The course follows the AP curriculum and emphasizes historical research and essay tests. Summer reading assignment to be completed prior to the start of the course. In the first two weeks of school, tests will be given on the first three chapters of the text.

Learner Outcomes:

 


U.S. History

3 credits

Grade Level: 11

Prerequisite: None

U.S. History is a three-trimester survey course taught chronologically from Columbus to the present. Important historical themes and their impact on history will highlight areas such as racism, technology, economics, war and peace, culture, and political theory. Testing, essays, projects, individual and group presentation, and discussion are part of course expectations.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Contemporary World Affairs

1 credit  

Grade Level: 11, 12  

Prerequisite: None  

This course enables students to read, discuss and analyze the issues and problems of the contemporary world. The topics include poverty and disease in Africa; peace in the Middle East; China’s role in the world as the number-one producer and consumer of goods. These three areas will be researched from an American foreign-policy perspective using news articles and the Internet. The assignments for the class include weekly news articles and a final project.

Grades are based on these assignments as well as oral and visual presentations, essay and objective tests.

Learner Outcomes:

 


AP Psychology

2 credits

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Permission from the instructor; recommendations from two teachers (forms available in the Social Studies Department)

This is a course for qualified students who wish to complete studies in high school equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology. The AP exam presumes at least one semester of college-level preparation, and the course will cover two trimesters at Academy of Holy Angels. The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Advantages

Learner Outcomes:

 


Sociology

1 credit

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Sociology studies human social behavior. It assumes a group and global perspective rather than an individual view. It studies norms, values, and interactions between groups. Sociological methods of inquiry will be used to examine: culture, social structure, socialization, deviant behavior, racial and ethnic relations, gender and age issues and social change.

Learner Outcomes:

 


Economics

1 credit

Grade: 12

A required course for 12th grade

This course examines the principles and practices of economics, a way of viewing the world in terms of scarcity and the distribution of resources. Both microeconomic and macroeconomic topics will be covered. Students will learn supply and demand, market structures, and other micro approaches. They will apply their learning to macro topics by studying both Austrian and Keynesian models, and then using these approaches to examine current challenges in global economics.

Learner Outcomes:


U.S. Government

1 credit

Grade Level: 12

Required for Seniors (except those taking AP Government) U. S. Government offered during Trimester 2 only.

American government and politics will be explored using contemporary information and events to better understand the United States government, politics and their impact. This course examines the three branches of government: executive, legislative, and judicial, as well as the impact of political parties, interest groups, and political participation.

Learner Outcomes:

 


AP U.S. Government & Politics

2 credits

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisite: Permission from the instructor; recommendations from two teachers (forms available in the Social Studies Department)

AP United States Government and Politics is a college-level nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions between political institutions, processes and behavior. They also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and application, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete an applied civics project.

The course assumes students wish to be challenged and exposed to the rigor of a college-level course. It is the expectation that each student enrolled will take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Grades for this course are weighted as an Advanced course.

Learner Outcomes:



Technology

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

Web Page Programming

Web Page Programming

Web Page Programming

Web Page Programming

Computer Art

Computer Art

Computer Art

Computer Art

 

Yearbook Production

Intro to Computer Science

Intro to Computer Science

   

AP Computer Science

AP Computer Science

   

Yearbook Production

Yearbook Production

Industrial Technology Courses

Architectural Model Building

Architectural Model Building

Architectural Model Building

Architectural Model Building

Computer Aided Drafting*

Computer Aided Drafting*

Computer Aided Drafting*

Computer Aided Drafting*

Woodworking I, II

Woodworking I, II

Woodworking I, II

Woodworking I, II

* College credit: Juniors and seniors earning a grade of A or B in Computer Aided Drafting will earn three college credits from Dakota County Technical College.


Department Philosophy

Our goal is to have AHA graduates proficient in their use of computers and specific applications. In addition, students will understand the evolving field of technology and become self-reliant in solving technology issues. Technology is integrated through core curriculum areas in all grades. Technology at AHA encourages independent research and learning, collaboration, problem solving, and global awareness. We teach our students to be responsible digital citizens. Students also are encouraged to explore the creative uses of technology through courses offered.

About STEM

AHA is an active participant in the STEM initiative--science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Its purpose is to foster interest in those academic areas because they help students develop skills in problem solving, innovation, logical thinking, and communication. They also learn about potential careers in STEM disciplines. Learn more


* College credit: Juniors and seniors earning a grade of A or B in Computer Aided Drafting will earn three college credits from Dakota County Technical College.


Computer Art

1 credit – Fine Arts or Technology Grade

Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

This class is for students with an interest in the visual arts and for students who enjoy hands-on, project-based, independent work using the computer as a tool.

The computer has found its way into every aspect of people’s lives. In the art world, the computer’s capabilities have just begun to be explored. Painting is a skill basic to all visual art, and using the computer to paint is a new, exciting way to learn the basics of artistic communication.

Using this medium, the student will explore new realms of self- expression, while developing an artist’s eye and vocabulary. Students will explore the capabilities of the computer in creating this new breed of art and gain a foundation in the visual arts.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Web Page Programming

1 credit

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

A class for students who want to create their own web page, develop their internet skills, and who enjoy hands-on, independent work.

The class format is a 10-to 20-minute presentation followed by independent computer work. Students need to be self-motivated and able to explore without specific instruction. The class will discuss Internet terminology.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Intro to Computer Science 

1 credit 

Grade Levels: 11, 12 

Prerequisites: Algebra II 

Web Design is recommended but not required. 

Intro to Computer Science is an introductory course in computer science. It focuses on programming in the Java language as a way to explore basic concepts in computer science. Students will get the opportunity to write Java code that will solve simple problems. Students will write programs using loops, conditional statements, variables, and methods. The course will be a simplified version of the first trimester of AP Computer Science. 

Learner Outcomes: 

Students will:


AP Computer Science

3 credits

Grade Levels: 11, 12

Prerequisites: Algebra II

Web Design is recommended but not required.

The Computer Science course is an introductory course in computer science. It focuses on programming in the Java language as a way to explore basic concepts in computer science and advanced problem solving. The course also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reus- able.

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Yearbook Production

1 credit

Grade Levels: 10,11, 12

Prerequisites: None

For students who display an interest in business, marketing, writing, photography, layout and design.

Yearbook students will learn how to create magazine-style pages through concise writing, sharp photographs, and meaningful headlines and captions. They will learn how to design and create layouts by using graphic design software. This year-long course can be taken more than once.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Industrial Technology Classes


Architectural Model Building

1 credit

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None. Drafting I recommended

Use computer software to render models of architectural buildings to bring them to life! Build 3-D models of homes and office buildings.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 

 


Woodworking I

1 credit

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

Learn the latest about the ‘why’ as well as the ‘how’ of machine woodworking, cabinetry, carpentry and patternmaking. Projects will be selected by the student, based on interest and skill level. A fee will be charged for wood, based on projects selected.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Woodworking II

1 credit

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Woodworking I

Use a computer to generate and design your project. Gain a more in-depth knowledge of woodworking techniques. A fee will be charged for wood, based on individual project selected.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 


Computer Aided Drafting

1 credit

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: None

After mastering pencil and T-square drawing, students will begin to use Auto CAD LT software to practice mechanical drafting and create architectural floor plans.

Learner Outcomes:

Students will:

 



Theology

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

Required

Required

Required

Required

Trimester I:

Trimester I:

Trimester I:

Choose:

Jesus and the Christian Community

The Church & the Paschal Mystery

Church History

Campus Ministry (year-long course)

Trimester II:

Trimester II:

Trimester II:

Or:

Bible I

Sacraments

Catholic Social Action

Trimester I:
 Moral Philosophy

Trimester III:

Trimester III:

Trimester III:

Trimester II:

Bible II

Morality

Prayer and Spirituality

Comparative Religions

Introduction to Christianity*

Introduction to Christianity*

Introduction to Christianity*

Trimester III:
Senior Theology Seminar 

     

Introduction to Christianity*

*New International Students Only: Year-long course 


Department Philosophy

The American Catholic Bishops’ pastoral letter on education outlines the educational mission of the Church as an integrated ministry embracing development of faith, building of community, and learning of service. The Theology Department of the Academy of Holy Angels seeks to develop this model of religious education, service learning, and faith formation. The Theology curriculum follows the high school curriculum framework established by the US Conference of Catholic Bishops. The textbooks used are approved as conforming to the framework and the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

A theology class is required for every student for every trimester of their education at the Academy of Holy Angels. With a balance of cognitive and affective learning, we invite students at their appropriate developmental level to an awareness of their church heritage, the gospel call to personal holiness, and the challenge of transforming the world into the Kingdom of Justice and Peace.

The Safe and Sacred Places Curriculum is used for the purpose of fulfilling the Protection of Children and Youth mandate of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. It is a safe and healthy relationship education program for the prevention of sexual abuse; it is not about sex education. If you have questions about this curriculum, please talk directly with the health teacher, a theology teacher, an administrator, or a counselor.

As a result, we hope to impart the following:

  1. Knowledge, experience and an appreciation of liturgy and the sacraments.
  2. Prayer and spirituality, as integral to faith formation, which are intentionally included in each Theology course.
  3. Understanding of and commitment to love of God and neighbor in justice and service.
  4. Knowledge and love of scripture.
  5. Understanding of doctrine and commitment to morality.
  6. Development of critical thinking, communication and service skills.
  7. An appreciation for the history and heritage of faith, service, and action established by the Sisters of St. Joseph as the founders of this school.
  8. A commitment to practice the values learned in theology courses throughout daily school activities as well as in extra-curriculars through the Faith in Action program.
  9. Realization of the mission of the Church, the school, and a deepening sense of membership in the Body of Christ. 

The STARS Service Requirement description can be found in Special Academic Programs.


Introduction to Christianity

1 credit

Grade Level: New International Students Only

Prerequisites: None

Department Chair & Counselor approval required.

This course is designed to help international students learn about Christianity in general and Catholicism in particular. Students will explore basic concept of the Christian faith. In the first and second trimesters, students will use the Bible as a foundation for study exploring both the Old and the New Testament. The third trimester of this course will be a focus on specifically Catholic aspects of faith such as sacraments, morality and Catholic Social Teaching. In addition to the theological concepts, students will be introduced to the charisms of the Sisters of St. Joseph and the traditions of Holy Angels. Special consideration will be given to helping students become more fully integrating into the Holy Angels community through volunteer service. The emphasis of this course is placed on preparing the students to succeed in subsequent theology courses.

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Students will continue to develop English skills.
  2. Students will recognize the identifying characteristics of the AHA community as founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.
  3. Students will demonstrate a basic understanding of Catholic Christianity, including the Sacraments, morality and Catholic social teaching.
  4. Students will explore the most important stories in the Bible.
  5. Students will be able to participate in religious ceremonies in a meaningful way.
  6. Students will be prepared to take other religion courses at Holy Angels.

 


Jesus and the Christian Community

1 credit

Grade Level: 9

Prerequisites: None

This course will immerse the students in Catholic spirituality through examination of the charisms of the Sisters of St. Joseph and Holy Angels traditions. Students will explore how to live Christian community as a student body through community-building activities, prayer, along with the CMT mentor program and volunteer service experiences.This course leads the students toward a deeper understanding of Divine Revelation, The Trinity, The Incarnation, Salvation, Jesus' life and ministry, and discipleship through academic exploration and prayer experiences.

Faith

Prayer and Service

 


Bible I

2 credits

Grade Level: 9

Prerequisites: None

This course leads the students toward a deeper understanding of the Bible and the history of our salvation and Jesus as the fulfillment of the Israelites’ covenant relationship with God. The students navigate the Bible and use basic exegetical skills while examining the relationship between Revelation and Inspiration. Throughout the trimester, students will use the scripture as the basis for daily prayer and apply principles of Christian discipleship through service.

Faith

Prayer

Service

 

Bible II

2 credits

Grade Level: 9

Prerequisites: None

This course leads the students toward a deeper understanding of the Bible, the history of our salvation, and Jesus as the fulfillment of the Israelites’ covenant relationship with God. The students navigate the Bible and use basic exegetical skills while examining the relationship between Revelation and Inspiration. Throughout the trimester, students will use the scriptures as the basis for daily prayer and apply principles of Christian discipleship through service.

Faith

Prayer

Service


Paschal Mystery and the Church

This course explores God’s plan for salvation through the ongoing mission of the Church. Students will explore how, through his suffering, death, resurrection, and ascension, Jesus makes our redemption possible. The course also addresses how we continually experience the Paschal Mystery in our lives by encountering Jesus in the Church. Students prayerfully reflect on Jesus’ invitation to participate in and contribute to the life of the Church. Students complete service requirements in connection with learner outcomes of the course.

 Faith

• Students will develop an understanding of the human need for redemption especially through an exploration of how Jesus is the fulfillment of God’s promise of redemption.
• Students will explore the central Catholic teachings of the Paschal Mystery and how we continually experience it in our lives.
• Students will identify the Church as a unique reality in which we meet God and explore the Church as instituted by the Holy Trinity.
• Students will explore the Church as mystery and as one, holy, catholic and apostolic.

 Service

 • Students will participate in applying the mission of the Church to today’s world through their own call and response to discipleship.


Sacraments

1 credit

Grade Level: 10

Prerequisites: None

This course leads the students toward understanding the liturgy and the Sacraments, instituted by Christ and given to us through the Church. The Sacraments are first introduced through an exploration of symbols and rituals, followed by a presentation of the Sacraments as signs and encounters with Christ in our lives. The Sacraments are then considered in their appropriate groupings: the Sacraments of Christian Initiation, the Sacraments of healing, and the Sacraments of service. Throughout the course, the importance of the Sacraments as encounters with Christ, and a strengthening of our relationship with God, is emphasized. This relationship in turn, sends us out to share the love of Christ with others, especially those in need. Students complete service hours towards yearly service requirements in connection with learner outcomes of the course.

Faith 

Students will understand how the sacraments are visible signs of God’s redemptive love and why we need the sacraments.

Prayer

Service

 Students will examine the sacraments of service as gateways into lives of public witness and service.


Morality

1 credit

Grade Level: 10

Prerequisite: None

This course leads the students toward understanding the liturgy and the Sacraments, instituted by Christ and given to us through the Church. The Sacraments are first introduced through an exploration of symbols and rituals, followed by a presentation of the Sacraments as signs and encounters with Christ in our lives. The Sacraments are then considered in their appropriate groupings: the Sacraments of Christian Initiation, the Sacraments of healing, and the Sacraments of service. Throughout the course, the importance of the Sacraments as encounters with Christ, and a strengthening of our relationship with God, is emphasized. This relationship in turn, sends us out to share the love of Christ with others, especially those in need. Students complete service hours towards yearly service requirements in connection with learner outcomes of the course.

Faith

Prayer

Service


Church History

1 credit

Grade Level: 11

Prerequisites: None

This course is intended to help students understand the Church in the world throughout time. The class will explore the major eras of the Church and major figures representative of each era. The course will explore Vatican II and its relation to the Church in our world today.  

Faith

Service

 


Catholic Social Action

1 credit

Grade Level: 11

Prerequisites: None

The course examines the core principles of Catholic Social Teaching based on Jesus’ vision of nonviolence and its practical application to the modern world. Students will examine principles for challenging injustices, concepts of power and powerlessness and our scriptural call to bringing about justice through peaceful means.The course will be taught using a variety of learning activities including small-group projects and presentations, lecture, reading, discussion, videos, experiential learning and journal reflections.

Faith

Service

 


Prayer and Spirituality

1 credit

Grade Level: 11

Prerequisites: None

Prayer is an essential component in our relationship with God and spiritual growth. In this course you will examine the tradition of Christian Spirituality through a variety of prayer experiences.  The course will be taught using various activities including small and large group discussions, journal reflections, meditation, prayer services, guest speakers, lectures, reading, research, scriptural reflection, and videos. The foundations for prayer and the structures for individual and communal prayer are explored through scripture, texts, and teachings and traditions of the Catholic Church.

Prayer

Faith

 

 


Moral Philosophy

1 credit

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisites: None

Moral Philosophy is a course for seniors that explores both ancient and modern moral philosophies. The course focuses on different ethical frameworks and their application through case studies. Students will learn about the moral philosophical systems of Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Catholicism. Students will study conscience formation. The course is discussion intensive with an emphasis on practical application. 

Faith

Service

Prayer


Comparative Religions

1 credit

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisites: None

This course examines various religions and religious beliefs in our world today, in light of Catholic church teaching on interreligious dialogue.This course is beneficial for students who want to gain a perspective about religions in the world other than Christianity. Major world religions will be presented. The purpose of the course is to help students acquire a working knowledge and respect for other organized religious communities with which they may have contact.

Faith

 


Senior Theology Seminar

1 credit

Grade Level: 9

Prerequisites: None

Senior Theology Seminar is a summative course with these elements: vocational awareness, field experience either as a job shadow or as volunteer service and leadership development in the Catholic context. This course provides a broad spectrum of information and experiences to empower students through public speaking, guest speakers and field experience. Students will present their synthesis project which reflects on their high school experience.

Faith

Service

 


CMT students lead class retreats

Campus Ministry

3 credits

Grade Level: 12

This class satisfies the senior year theology requirement

Prerequisites: 

Completion of these elements of the discernment process below:

  1. Complete an essay on personal faith (practice and relationship with God).
  2. Submit a Service Learning Proposal at the time of application.   

This course provides a broad background of information and experiences to empower students to minister in the areas of faith, service, and pastoral care to work for the deepening of the spiritual life of the AHA community. Core content is focused on liturgy, prayer, service, retreats, faith sharing, outreach, and Christian leadership. In order to empower others to share in ministry, a very high commitment to service as well as personal faith development through organization, written reflections and hands-on experience is needed in this course.

Faith

Prayer

Service

Senior Theology Seminar is a summative course with these elements: vocational awareness, field experience either as a job shadow or as volunteer service and leadership development in the Catholic context. This course provides a broad spectrum of information and experiences to empower students through public speaking, guest speakers and field experience. Students will present their synthesis project which reflects on their high school experience.

 

Faith

 

Service



World Languages

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

French I

French I, II

French I, II, III

French I, II, III, IV

German I

German I, II

German I, II, III

German I, II, III, IV

Spanish I

Spanish I, II

Spanish I, II, III

Spanish I, II, III, IV/AP, V

Chinese I

Chinese I, II

Chinese I, II, III

Chinese I, II, III, IV


Department Philosophy

Our world has become smaller due to expanded communications and increased global travel and business opportunities. As a society, we need to realize that knowledge of a second language and an understanding of other cultures are vital in today’s world. Students need to be prepared to become active citizens of the global community. Learning languages provides a valuable business and educational tool, practical advantages and the lifelong value of understanding a second language and its cultures.

Since students who learn a world language are college-bound, we believe in equipping them with the language skills necessary to succeed in intermediate or upper-level college courses or to fulfill their world language requirement by passing a proficiency test. Therefore, we recommend that a student take two to three years, preferably four years, of a language.

Department Learner Outcomes:

Why study a second language?

Students who have good reading and spelling skills in English are strongly advised to begin a world language sequence freshman year. Language students must receive a passing grade at each level in order to continue the language course the following trimester. Students earning “F” grades will be required to repeat the course for an audit before moving on to the next level. Students earning “D” grades will work with their language teachers and guidance counselor on a contract for enrollment in subsequent courses.

Freshmen with previous language experience must pass a proficiency test and an oral interview to be placed in a higher level course.

Transfer students are encouraged to meet a World Languages Department teacher before registering for their language class.

Students who are successful in their study of a second language are encouraged to begin the study of a third language.

Students are expected to buy their workbooks (approximately $25).

Real Life Experiences in World Cultures

Travel experience to French, German, and Spanish-speaking countries is offered during spring and summer breaks, depending on student interest and program availability. Students in Level II or above and who show enthusiasm for language study may apply. 

The World Language Certificates & Seals description can be found in Special Academic Programs.


Chinese I, French I, German I, Spanish I

3 credits

Prerequisite: None

Advantages: Getting a firm foundation in the basics of a language

The Level I World Language classes are for students in any grade level who are interested in learning a second language and the
culture of the peoples who speak it.

Level I provides students with the tools to communicate about themselves, their hobbies and interests, school life, family life, shopping and foods.

Learner Outcomes:

 

 


French II, German II, Spanish II, Chinese II

3 credits

Prerequisites: Level I with a minimum recommended grade of C-

Advantages: Continuation of building a firm foundation in the basics of a language. Colleges generally require a minimum of two to three years of the same language for admission.

The Level II classes are for students in any grade who are interested in continuing to learn a second language and its culture.

Level II provides students with the tools to expand their communication about themselves, their hobbies and interests, school life, family life, shopping and foods.

Learner Outcomes:

 


French III, German III*, Spanish III, Chinese III*

3 credits

Prerequisites: Level II with a minimum recommended grade of C-

Advantages: Students will be prepared to succeed in intermediate level college courses, satisfy their world language requirement for admission to some colleges, or in the case of others, completely fulfill the language requirement.

Level III classes are for students who truly enjoy the language, are interested in acquiring more advanced language skills, and have successfully completed Level II.

Level III provides students with the tools to communicate in a variety of real life situations (i.e., asking for and giving information about travel, movies, theater, health issues, personal appearance, current events, etc.). Students will read short stories and plays in the target language.

Learner Outcomes:

*Chinese III and IV will be offered as a combined course.
*German III and IV will be offered as a combined  course.

 


French IV, German IV*, Chinese IV*, Spanish IV/AP

3 credits

Prerequisites: Level III with a minimum recommended grade of C-

Advantages: Weighted grade Students solidify and strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write the language. Students can boast four continuing years of study of a language on their college application. Students feel a sense of satisfaction in reaching a higher level of ability in the language.

Level IV classes are for students who truly enjoy the language and are interested in more advanced language skills and have successfully completed Level III.

Level IV provides students with the tools to communicate at an intermediate level in a variety of real life situations (i.e., leisure, communication, family, music, multicultural society, environmental concerns).

Level IV classes are conducted primarily in the target language and students are expected to communicate in that language.

The AP test is available to students in Level IV. The Spanish IV/AP course prepares the students for the exam.

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and may take the AP exam in May. (Additional Cost of AP workbooks is approximately $48.)

Spanish IV/AP course is approved through the University of St. Mary’s PACC Program.

Learner Outcomes:

*Chinese III and IV will be offered as a combined course.
*German III and IV will be offered as a combined  course.


Spanish V

Prerequisites: Level IV with a minimum recommended grade of C-.

Advantages: Weighted grade. Students solidify what they have already learned in previous years. Students deepen their cultural understanding, preparing them for intermediate and advanced coursework at the university level. Students feel a sense of pride for having achieved a high level of proficiency.

Level V classes are for students who wish to enrich their written, spoken and oral aspects of the Spanish language at the advanced level.

Level V classes are conducted entirely in Spanish. Students are expected to already have acquired a solid command of the language because grammar is only taught or reviewed as remedial work.

Learner Outcomes: