Social Studies

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

Required:

 

Required:

Required:

World History & Geography

 

AP United States History or

Trimester 1: Economics

   

United States History

Trimester II: AP US Government & Politics (Two Trimesters) or US Government

     

Trimester III: AP US Government & Politics or Sociology or Contemporary World Affairs

Electives:

20th Century World Studies

20th Century World Studies

 
 

 AP Psychology (Two Trimesters)

AP Psychology

(Two Trimesters)

AP Psychology (Two Trimesters)

   

Sociology

Sociology 

   

Contemporary World Affairs

 Contemporary World Affairs

Department Philosophy

The Holy Angels Social Studies Department offers a wide selection of academic courses and experiences designed to help students acquire the knowledge and skills demanded by an increasingly interdependent world. Students are challenged to analyze, evaluate, and fully comprehend the many complicated factors that shape individuals and the larger communities to which they belong. We encourage our students to both respect tradition and continually seek opportunities to inspire positive changes locally and globally.

Department Outcomes:

Within the Social Studies Department, students will be able to: 

  • Promote understanding and respect for all cultures and peoples.
  • Develop an awareness of the global interdependence of all peoples and nations.
  • Develop skills to evaluate with competence social, economic, political, and cultural systems in the U.S. and other nations.
  • Develop knowledge, insight, and positive attitudes toward citizenship, change and community involvement. 

 


World History & Geography

3 credits

Grade Level: 9

A required course for 9th grade

World History is a year-long course that studies the emergence and development of eastern and western cultures. In the first trimester students will study the 5 Themes of Geography, ancient river civilizations, and the classical civilizations. During the second trimester students will examine developments in the Muslim, Byzantine, and East Asian Empires before investigating European societies from the Middle Ages to the rise of absolute monarchs. In the third trimester students will trace the impact of social and industrial revolutions on developing and non-developing nations. The course concludes with the study of the causes and impacts of World War I on the twentieth century.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will discuss the impact of geography on historical events and cultures.
  • Students will identify and respect diverse cultures.
  • Students will develop reading, research, and writing skills to further academic success.
  • Students will compare and contrast the development of civilizations in different regions.
  • Students will develop historical consciousness.
  • Students will incorporate the application of technology in historical analysis.
  • Students will promote cultural literacy to better engage an increasingly diverse world.

 


Twentieth Century World Studies

1 credit

Grade Level: 10, 11

An elective for all sophomores or juniors who enjoy and appreciate the study of history.

This course has been designed to provide practicing historians with a provocative and engaging study of the people, places, events, and movements that shaped the Twentieth Century. Topics include the world at war, imperialism, independence movements, the influence of political ideologies ranging from communism to fascism, totalitarian regimes, the expansion of civil and human rights, religious fundamentalism, and the triumph of the individual. Students enhance their understanding of this tumultuous century by reading short novels and viewing feature films related to the course’s major themes. This elective class is offered to sophomores and juniors who have a particular interest in history and who are willing to take a non-traditional approach to learning about the past and present. This course is offered first trimester only.

Related skills:

  • Critical analysis of related literary and film works.
  • Group discussion and debate regarding controversial topics.
  • Written and oral communication.
  • Recognizing cause-and-effect relationships.
  • Developing social, political, and moral consciousness.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the forces that molded the Twentieth Century.
  • Students will improve learning and study skills.
  • Students will complete group projects and oral presentations.
  • Students will develop an appreciation for historical fiction (both literary and film).

AP United States History

3 credits

Grade Level: 11

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor; recommendations from two teachers (forms available in the Social Studies Department)

For college-bound, self-motivated juniors who have good reading and writing skills.

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

Advantages:

  • Course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement United States History Examination in May.
  • This class is excellent preparation for the SAT subject test in American History.
  • This class has a weighted grade.

This is a rigorous college-level course. It uses a college textbook, which focuses on the issues and themes of the United States from the era of discovery and exploration to the present. The course follows the AP curriculum and emphasizes historical research and essay tests. Summer reading assignment to be completed prior to the start of the course. In the first two weeks of school, tests will be given on the first three chapters of the text.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will employ the information from America’s past to analyze foreign policy and domestic issues of the present.
  • Students will identify the culture of past and present America.
  • Students will gain experience in using primary and secondary sources for research.
  • Students will learn to prepare and write blue book historical essay tests and papers.
  • Students will discuss and analyze current event topics.
  • Students will participate in group discussions and projects; make oral presentations.

 


U.S. History

3 credits

Grade Level: 11

Prerequisite: None

U.S. History is a three-trimester survey course taught chronologically from Columbus to the present. Important historical themes and their impact on history will highlight areas such as racism, technology, economics, war and peace, culture, and political theory. Testing, essays, projects, individual and group presentation, and discussion are part of course expectations.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will identify the culture (art, music, media) of past and present America.
  • Students will describe how the events of the past have impacted and formed present America.
  • Students will research and write a paper each trimester.
  • Students will make oral presentations individually or in a group.

 


Contemporary World Affairs

1 credit  

Grade Level: 11, 12  

Prerequisite: None  

This course enables students to read, discuss and analyze the issues and problems of the contemporary world. The topics include poverty and disease in Africa; peace in the Middle East; China’s role in the world as the number-one producer and consumer of goods. These three areas will be researched from an American foreign-policy perspective using news articles and the Internet. The assignments for the class include weekly news articles and a final project.

Grades are based on these assignments as well as oral and visual presentations, essay and objective tests.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will be familiar with the contemporary issues and problems in three areas of the world.
  • Students will read weekly current event articles on these countries.
  • Students will use research and writing skills for papers.
  • Students will do oral presentations and work in groups.

 


AP Psychology

2 credits

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Permission from the instructor; recommendations from two teachers (forms available in the Social Studies Department)

This is a course for qualified students who wish to complete studies in high school equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology. The AP exam presumes at least one semester of college-level preparation, and the course will cover two trimesters at Academy of Holy Angels. The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Advantages

  • Students prepare to take the AP Psychology exam in May.
  • This class gives students a college level base of knowledge in a field with a wide variety of academic applications.
  • This class has a weighted grade.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will analyze the exploration and discovery of psychologists over the last century, and the application of modern technology to expand the field.
  • Students will assess the different approaches adopted by psychologists, including biological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural perspectives.
  • Students will explain how psychologists use critical analysis to model their words and actions. 

 


Sociology

1 credit

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Sociology studies human social behavior. It assumes a group and global perspective rather than an individual view. It studies norms, values, and interactions between groups. Sociological methods of inquiry will be used to examine: culture, social structure, socialization, deviant behavior, racial and ethnic relations, gender and age issues and social change.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will analyze data received from research methods.
  • Students will gain a greater understanding and respect for racial, gender, age and other group differences.

 


Economics

1 credit

Grade: 12

A required course for 12th grade

This course examines the principles and practices of economics, a way of viewing the world in terms of scarcity and the distribution of resources. Both microeconomic and macroeconomic topics will be covered. Students will learn supply and demand, market structures, and other micro approaches. They will apply their learning to macro topics by studying both Austrian and Keynesian models, and then using these approaches to examine current challenges in global economics.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will have a greater understanding of how the American economic system works and affects daily life.
  • Students will be able to describe the factors that lead to economic shifts and their broader impact.
  • Students will be able to analyze and interpret the role of the government in our economic system.
  • Students will be able to discuss the origins and effects of changes on the business cycle.
  • Students will be aware of current issues and challenges in economics, both in the United States and abroad.

U.S. Government

1 credit

Grade Level: 12

Required for Seniors (except those taking AP Government) U. S. Government offered during Trimester 2 only.

American government and politics will be explored using contemporary information and events to better understand the United States government, politics and their impact. This course examines the three branches of government: executive, legislative, and judicial, as well as the impact of political parties, interest groups, and political participation.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will use research and writing skills for an argumentative paper.
  • Students will know how citizens can take part in government and politics.
  • Students will be familiar with the American political system.
  • Students will understand the impact government has on our daily lives.
  • Students will compare US Government to other governmental systems.
  • Students will critically evaluate various media sources.

 


AP U.S. Government & Politics

2 credits

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisite: Permission from the instructor; recommendations from two teachers (forms available in the Social Studies Department)

AP United States Government and Politics is a college-level nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions between political institutions, processes and behavior. They also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and application, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete an applied civics project.

The course assumes students wish to be challenged and exposed to the rigor of a college-level course. It is the expectation that each student enrolled will take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Grades for this course are weighted as an Advanced course.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will describe and explain constitutional and political institutions, principles, processes, models, and/or beliefs. 
  • Students will explain connections among political behaviors, institutions, beliefs, and cultural factors. 
  • Students will read, analyze, and interpret quantitative data to draw conclusions about political principles, processes, behaviors, and outcomes. 
  • Students will read, analyze, and interpret qualitative sources. 
  • Students will develop evidence-based arguments about political principles, processes, behaviors, and outcomes.
  • Students will apply political concepts, processes, and Supreme Court decisions to scenarios in context.