English

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh Grade

Twelfth Grade

12 credits required for graduation

 

 

 

Required courses:

 

 

 

English 9, or

English 10 or

English 11 or

English 12 or

Advanced English 9

Advanced English 10

AP English Language and Composition

AP English Literature and Composition


English Department Philosophy

The English Department is a vital part of the educational program. We are committed to providing our students with instruction that is consistent and supportive of our Catholic Christian values. Rooted in AHA's mission, we strive to educate the whole student: intellectually, spiritually, morally, and emotionally.

The English Department plays a primary role in preparing our students for the world outside of school. Thus, we challenge our students to use the study of literature and language to become responsible, moral, and faith-committed members of their society. The study of literature shows students the relevance of the human experience to their own lives and exposes them to the rich cultural diversity that surrounds them. Instilling a love for reading and an appreciation of language in our students is a prime goal of the department. We encourage our students to be active participants in the learning process and to question themselves, their instructors, and each other. Our students learn to promote change rather than to accept life passively, particularly where it concerns the welfare of others.

To ensure that our students will be successful in the future, we teach effective written and oral communication skills. Realizing that the world is ever changing, instructors attempt to give their students the tools that they will need to speak articulately; to write clearly for various audiences; to use technology effectively and ethically; and to think critically, analytically, and creatively. Our goal is to create life-long learners.

Department Learner Outcomes:

Upon graduation students will:

  • Exhibit competent spoken and written communication.
  • Comprehend demanding literature and technical writing.
  • Demonstrate critical, analytical, creative thinking, and problem solving skills.
  • Exhibit broad language and vocabulary skills.
  • Produce effective expository writing, research & synthesis skills
  • Gain respect for each individual’s diversity and point of view.
  • Experience assigned reading inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Acquire skills and practice for collaborative endeavors.
  • Be well-prepared for college, career, and beyond.
  • Be proficient in using technology as a learning and resource tool. 

The Writing Across the Curriculum description can be found in Special Academic Programs.


English 9

3 credits

Prerequisites: None

English 9 is for all freshmen not enrolled in Advanced English 9.

Reading novels, poetry, drama, and non-fiction are all cornerstones of the English 9 curriculum.  Through discussion and writing, students will examine how texts relate to the human experience and its many aspects: love, conflict, choices, destiny, and society.  Over the course of the year, students will grow in their grammar and writing mechanics with one in-class essay and one summative essay each trimester.  Freshman will have the opportunity to read a wide range of texts from Greek mythology, Shakespeare, Minnesota author Sandra Benitez, and many more diverse voices. 

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will study and use new vocabulary words.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in writing formal summative essays, as well as in-class essays each trimester.
  • Students will read and study major literary works and authors.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.
  • Students will learn to organize and present speeches to peers.
  • Students will incorporate technology as an additional learning tool.

Advanced English 9

3 credits

Students must maintain a “C” average to remain in Advanced English.

Prerequisites: A student considering Advanced English 9 should excel in English, have a grade of A in English 8, and have a score in the 90th percentile on the placement exam or take the AHA English placement offered in the spring of the eighth grade year.

Advantages: Weighted grade; Advanced Placement tests junior and/or senior year.

This is a class for a student who truly loves to read and enjoys studying literature and writing, possesses analytical skills, and likes working independently and collaboratively on challenging material. Advanced English 9 offers an in-depth study of modern and classic novels, plays (including Shakespeare), poetry, mythology, and short stories. Students will work to strengthen their grammar usage and style for greater clarity in their writing. Overall, the class focuses on writing and critical thinking skills. Finally, students are expected to read assigned texts during major school vacations.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will write several major essays including critical analysis of literature.
  • Students will read, discuss, and analyze works from various genres.
  • Students will make oral presentations.
  • Students will expand critical thinking skills.
  • Students will incorporate technology as an additional learning tool.
  • Students will study and recognize new vocabulary.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

AHA English DepartmentEnglish 10

3 credits

Prerequisites: None

English 10 is for sophomores not enrolled in Advanced English 10.

English 10 is a composition and literature-based course with emphasis on vocabulary, proper writing mechanics, grammar, and literary elements. Students will examine diverse literature including Greek, American, British, and world texts. Students will also write a formal research paper, working on it throughout one trimester. The course lays the foundation for English 11 and 12.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will write several short compositions (argumentative and creative) first trimester.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in writing formal summative essays, as well as in-class essays each trimester.
  • Students will read and study several authors and major literary genres.
  • Students will prepare and give oral presentations.
  • Students will study and recognize new vocabulary words.
  • Students will write a research paper with a rough draft and final copy.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

 


Advanced English 10

3 credits

Students must maintain a “C” average to remain in Advanced English.

Prerequisites: Advanced English 9 or an A in English 9, teacher recommendation, required additional outside reading to transition to the Advanced track.

Advantages: Weighted grade; Advanced Placement tests in junior and/or senior year

Advanced English 10 delves into the growth of British Literature and its reflection of the social, economic, religious, and political views of its differing time periods. The course begins with Beowulf and Anglo-Saxon writings; students then study Chaucer and the Medieval Period before learning about the influential poets and writers from the Renaissance. Sophomores continue their studies of British Literature by focusing on arguments from the Age of Reason, reading novels such as Frankenstein and Jane Eyre, and performing the drama Macbeth. These texts invite students to partake in intellectual conversations and written analysis; every trimester students write at least one in-class essay and one formal summative essay. 

Students are expected to read assigned novels during major school vacations. They will sharpen their oral and written communication skills as they read, discuss, react and support their opinions, write compositions, and work cooperatively with their peers.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will write two major papers of literary analysis and criticism, and several shorter compositions each trimester.
  • Students will read and study major authors and literary genres of British history and literature..
  • Students will prepare and give oral presentations.
  • Students will study and recognize new vocabulary.
  • Students will write a major research paper with a rough draft and final copy.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. 

English 11

3 credits

Prerequisites: None

English 11 is for all juniors not enrolled in AP English 11.

This chronological survey of American literature allows students the opportunity to appreciate and understand their literary heritage as they make connections between the past and present. Trimester one begins with short selections from early American literature and The Scarlet Letter, and continues with poetry and selections from the Literary Nationalist era and America’s Golden Era.

Trimesters two and three cover mid-19th century to the 20th century as students read short stories and novels.

Modern literature includes The Great Gatsby (1925), The Harvest Gypsies (1930s), Death of a Salesman (1940s), Fences (1950s), Fools Crow (1986) and other selections. Students will sharpen their oral and written communication skills as they read, discuss, react and support their opinions, write, and work cooperatively with others.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will demonstrate competency in writing formal summative essays, as well as in-class essays each trimester.
  • Students will write various short compositions.
  • Students will study American authors.
  • Students will analyze American literature and history and read from several genres: non-fiction, novels, short stories, poetry, and plays.
  • Students will prepare and give oral presentations.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in mechanics and punctuation.

AP English Language and Composition

3 credits

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in AP English Language and Composition.

Prerequisites: Advanced English 9, Advanced English 10, or an A average in English and teacher recommendation with required outside reading to transition into the AP track.

Advantages: Advanced Placement Exam in Language and Composition offered in May; college credit through PACC; weighted grade

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

This class is for the serious, dedicated English student. Highly demanding, the course is taught as a college course. The student should be able to work independently on both in-class and out-of-class reading and writing assignments. AP English Language and Composition will focus primarily on rhetoric, a survey of American literature and history, and nonfiction.

The class will concentrate on critical reading and rhetorical and stylistic analysis. The goal is to create strong writers. Students will write essays of all types: argumentative, expository, analytical, and personal. They will study a wide variety of forms of literature and non-fiction. They will become familiar with prose from various time periods, disciplines, and rhetorical situations. Instruction includes AP Language and Composition test preparation. Students are expected to complete assignments during major school vacations.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will read and study many different types of literature and non-fiction.
  • Students will write a wide variety of essays, with an emphasis on rhetorical analysis, synthesis and argument.
  • Students will study and practice rhetorical speech and writing.
  • Students will learn to write for specific audiences and purposes.
  • Students will learn to identify and employ rhetorical strategies.
  • Students will analyze the literature and history of the United States. 

 


English 12

3 credits

Grade Level: 12

For all seniors: this class emphasizes skills that students will need in college courses.

In this course, students read literature of the world geographically. We discover the culture of the people expressed through literature, while incorporating background information of cultural values and the context of the works.  Students also reflect on how their own cultural beliefs and experiences influence their view of the world today.  Reading selections range from ancient texts (Gilgamesh) to modern short stories written by current authors (Gortimer).  In addition to literature, this course emphasizes a variety of college writing skills.

Learner Outcomes

  • Students will write both critically and creatively, including analysis, comparison and contrast, and narrative.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in writing formal summative essays, as well as in-class essays each trimester.
  • Students will distinguish and apply the terms of literary analysis.
  • Students will be able to identify, examine, and analyze universal themes found in fiction and nonfiction.
  • Students will demonstrate competency in writing mechanics.

AP English Literature and Composition

3 credits

Students must maintain a "C" average to remain in AP English Literature and Composition.

Prerequisites:  Advanced English 9, Advanced English 10, AP English Language and Composition, and/or teacher recommendation with required outside reading to transition into the AP track.

Advantages: Advanced Placement in Literature and Composition exam offered in May; college credit through PACC; weighted grade

For the serious, dedicated English student. Highly demanding, the course operates as a college course.

Students enrolled in AP classes will prepare for and take the AP exam in May. Any waivers must be approved by the instructor and the principal.

AP English Literature and Composition examines major pieces of world literature ranging from the classical to the modern. Students will read, discuss and analyze, and write about works by Shakespeare, Voltaire, Beckett, Camus, Sartre, Dostoyevsky, and many others. Additionally, students will study modern poetry and short stories. Writing will be a major component of study, and students will receive instruction in various forms of prose styles. Instruction will include AP Literature and Composition test preparation. Students are expected to read assigned novels during major school vacations.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Students will write three to four major essays per trimester.
  • Students will read and discuss three to four major literary works per trimester.
  • Students will learn to research and use literary criticism.
  • Students will teach a literary work to the class.